Page Banner

United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: DEVELOPMENT AND PREVENTION OF CHILDHOOD OBESITY

Location: Children's Nutrition Research Center

Title: The impact of dairy and sweetened beverage consumption on diet and weight of a multi-ethnic population of head start mothers

Authors
item O'Neil, Carol -
item Nicklas, Theresa -
item Liu, Yan -
item Franklin, Frank -

Submitted to: Journal of Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: December 1, 2008
Publication Date: April 1, 2009
Citation: O'Neil, C.E., Nicklas, T.A., Liu, Y., Franklin, F.A. 2009. The impact of dairy and sweetened beverage consumption on diet and weight of a multi-ethnic population of head start mothers [abstract]. FASEB J. 23:551.12.

Technical Abstract: The objective of this study was to assess the association of milk and sweetened beverage (SwB) consumption with nutrient intake, dietary adequacy, and weight of Head Start mothers. Using a cross sectional, secondary analysis, Black (43%), Hispanic-American (33%), and White (24%) women (n=609) were divided into four beverage consumption groups: high milk/low SwB, high milk/high SwB, low milk/low SwB, and low milk/high SwB. Twenty four hour diet recalls from 3 non-consecutive days were averaged to determine nutrient intake. Dietary adequacy was determined with the Mean Adequacy Ratio (MAR). Mean body mass index (BMI) for the beverage consumption groups was compared; there were no differences among the groups (mean BMI 30.8 + 0.3 [SE]). Women in the high milk/low SwB group had higher intakes of vitamins A, D, and B6; riboflavin; thiamin; folate; phosphorus; calcium; iron; magnesium; and potassium (p < 0.0125 for all) when compared with the other groups. MAR was highest in the high milk/low SwB (71.8 + 0.8) and lowest in the low milk/high SwB (58.4 + 0.8) groups (p < 0.0125). Women in the high milk/low SwB group consumed more dense nutrient foods. Overall, consumption of milk was low. Consumption of high milk/low SwB was associated with improved nutrient intake, including the short -fall nutrients: calcium, potassium, magnesium, and vitamin A.

Last Modified: 7/25/2014
Footer Content Back to Top of Page