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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: IMPROVING SOIL AND NUTRIENT MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS FOR SUSTAINED PRODUCTIVITY AND ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY

Location: Soil Plant Nutrient Research (SPNR)

Title: Production of Hybrid Poplar under Short-Term, Intensive Culture in Western Colorado

Authors
item Pearson, Calvin, -
item Halvorson, Ardell
item Moench, Randy -
item Hammon, Robert -

Submitted to: Industrial Crops and Products
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: February 16, 2010
Publication Date: March 25, 2010
Citation: Pearson, Calvin, Halvorson, A.D., Moench, R., Hammon, R. 2010. Production of Hybrid Poplar under Short-Term, Intensive Culture in Western Colorado. Industrial Crops and Products. 31:492-498.

Interpretive Summary: A 6 yr study conducted at Fruita, Colorado evaluated the productivity and carbon sequestration of eight hybrid poplar clones [Populus nigra x P. maximowiczii (NM6), P. trichocarpa x P. deltoides (52225, OP367), and P. deltoides x P. nigra (Norway, Noreaster, Raverdaus, 14274, 14272)] under an irrigated, short-term, intensive culture. Growth, aerial biomass yield, dry matter partitioning, carbon sequestration, and insect and disease infestation data were collected. OP367 and 52225 consistently had larger tree diameters than other hybrids. Averaged across clones, yield was 58.4 Mg ha-1. OP367 had the highest yield at 72.2 Mg ha-1 and 14274 had the lowest yield at 41.0 Mg ha-1. Carbon sequestration in above ground biomass after 6 yr was highest for OP367 at 33.4 Mg C ha-1 and lowest for 14274 at 18.8 Mg C ha-1. Of the eight clones tested, OP367 was the most adapted and productive clone in this short-term, intensive culture system in the arid environment of the Grand Valley of western Colorado as evidenced by its productive growth, yield, insect resistance, winter hardiness, and tree architecture. Several insect species infested the poplar clones over the course of the rotation. Best management practices for growers who produce hybrid poplar under short-term, intensive culture should include the following: 1) Plant highly productive clones, 2) Plant Poplar clones with suitable tree architecture for production and market objectives, 3) If carbon sequestration is an important production objective, plant a suitable clone, 4) Avoided poplar clones that develop chlorosis when planted in high pH soils, and 5) Use poplar clones with resistance to specific insect species.

Technical Abstract: An irrigated study was conducted at the Western Colorado Research Center at Fruita for 6 yr to evaluate eight hybrid poplar clones under short-term, intensive culture. The eight clones included in the study were Populus nigra x P. maximowiczii (NM6), P. trichocarpa x P. deltoides (52225, OP367), and P. deltoides x P. nigra (Norway, Noreaster, Raverdaus, 14274, 14272). Data were collected for growth, aerial biomass yield, dry matter partitioning, carbon sequestration, and insect and disease infestation. OP367 and 52225 consistently had larger tree diameters than other hybrids for each of the six years. Averaged across clones, yield was 58.4 Mg ha-1. OP367 had the highest yield at 72.2 Mg ha-1 and 14274 had the lowest yield at 41.0 Mg ha-1. The yield of OP367 was 1.8 times greater than that of 14274. Carbon yield over the 6 years of testing was highest for OP367 at 33.4 Mg C ha-1 and lowest for 14274 at 18.8 Mg C ha-1. Of the eight clones tested, OP367 was the most adapted and productive clone in this short-term, intensive culture system in the arid environment of the Grand Valley of western Colorado as evidenced by its productive growth, yield, insect resistance, winter hardiness, and tree architecture. Several insect species infested the poplar clones over the course of the rotation. Best management practices for growers who produce hybrid poplar under short-term, intensive culture should include the following: 1) Plant highly productive clones, 2) Poplar clones with suitable tree architecture for production and market objectives should be used, 3) If carbon sequestration is an important production objective, plant a suitable clone, 4) Some poplar clones develop chlorosis when planted in high pH soils and should be avoided, 5) Use poplar clones that have been shown to exhibit resistance to specific insect species. [GRACENet publication].

Last Modified: 10/1/2014
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