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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: MANAGEMENT OF TEMPERATE FRUIT NUT AND SPECIALTY CROP GENETIC RESOURCES

Location: National Clonal Germplasm Repository (Corvallis, Oregon)

Title: Ribes Bloom Phenology: Section Botrycarpum and Ribes

Authors
item Dalton, Daniel -
item Hummer, Kim

Submitted to: Journal of American Pomological Society
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: February 11, 2010
Publication Date: July 20, 2010
Citation: Dalton, D.T., Hummer, K.E. 2010. Ribes Bloom Phenology: Section Botrycarpum and Ribes. Journal of American Pomological Society. 64(3):140-150.

Interpretive Summary: The USDA Agricultural Research Service has a fruit genebank at the National Clonal Germplasm Repository (NCGR) in Corvallis, OR, with a large collections of currants and gooseberries. These plants were observed to determine the time of first bloom. Plants of 106 black and 53 red currants were observed weekly during the springs of 1999, 2001, 2003, 2007, and 2008. The dates were recorded for first leaf , and first, full, and last bloom. The dates were converted to growing degree-day (GDD) values using a heat accumulation model. Mean first bloom for red currants occurred at 247 GDD, and for black currants (section Botrycarpum) at 256 GDD. Black and red currant plants flowered in the same relative order each year, though the dates changed due to cold or warm springs. Black currants, such ‘StorKlas’ and ‘Ben Tirran,’ and red currants, ‘Mulka’ and ‘Moore’s Ruby,’ bloom in late spring and are adapted to avoid early-season frosts. These cultivars can be grown in locations with long, cool springs. Early-flowering cultivars, such as ‘Risager’ and ‘Wilder,’ may be suited for production in mountainous environments where the growing season is short and heat accumulates rapidly at the onset of summer. Breeders or growers can choose the cultivars which flower in succession from early to late spring.

Technical Abstract: The USDA Agricultural Research Service Ribes L. genebank at the National Clonal Germplasm Repository (NCGR) in Corvallis, OR was surveyed to determine timing of first bloom. Accessions of 106 black and 53 red currant genotypes were observed weekly during the springs of 1999, 2001, 2003, 2007, and 2008. Julian dates were recorded for first leaf emergence, and first, full, and last bloom. The dates were converted to growing degree-day (GDD) values using a heat accumulation model set to begin on 1 January at a base temperature of 5° C. Mean first bloom for red currants (section Ribes) occurred at 247 GDD, and for black currants (section Botrycarpum) at 256 GDD. Significant interaction was observed between botanical section and year, although genotypes within a section flowered in the same relative order. This report documents cultivars with blooming phenologies suited for a range of production goals and environments. Black currants, such as R. nigrum L. ‘StorKlas’ and ‘Ben Tirran,’ and red currants, R. ×koehnianum Jancz. ‘Mulka’ and R. rubrum L. ‘Moore’s Ruby,’ bloom in late spring and are adapted to avoid early-season frosts. These cultivars can be grown in locations with long, cool springs. Early-flowering cultivars, such as R. nigrum ‘Risager’ and R. rubrum ‘Wilder,’ may be suited for production in mountainous environments where the growing season is short and heat accumulates rapidly at the onset of summer. Genotypes from both sections show potential for growers to incorporate cultivars which flower in succession from early to late spring.

Last Modified: 4/21/2014
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