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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: NUTRITION, EXERCISE PHYSIOLOGY, AND SARCOPENIA Title: Physical activity in prefrail older adults: confidence and satisfaction related to physical function

Authors
item Rejeski, Walter Jack -
item King, Abigail -
item Katula, Jeffrey -
item Kritchevsky, Stephen -
item Miller, Michael -
item Walkup, Michael -
item Glynn, Nancy -
item Pahor, Marco -
item Fielding, Roger -

Submitted to: Journal of Gerontology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: August 31, 2007
Publication Date: January 1, 2008
Citation: Rejeski, W., King, A.C., Katula, J.A., Kritchevsky, S., Miller, M.E., Walkup, M.P., Glynn, N.W., Pahor, M., Fielding, R.A. 2008. Physical activity in prefrail older adults: confidence and satisfaction related to physical function. Journal of Gerontology. 63(1):19-26.

Interpretive Summary: As the life expectancy in the United States has continued to rise, the maintenance of physical and cognitive independence of older Americans has emerged as a major clinical and public health priority. A critical factor in an older person’s ability to function independently is mobility, or the ability to move without assistance. We examined the hypothesis that physical activity will have favorable effects on measures of a person’s confidence in their ability to walk 1/4 of a mile (400 meters) and their satisfaction with their physical ability. We studied a total of 412 adults aged 70–89 years at elevated risk for mobility disability who were assigned to either a physical activity or a successful aging educational control intervention for one year. Participants in the physical activity intervention had more favorable changes in both measures (satisfaction and confidence) as a result of treatment than those in the successful aging intervention.

Technical Abstract: We examined the hypothesis that physical activity will have favorable effects on measures of self-efficacy for a 400-m walk and satisfaction with physical functioning in older adults 701 years of age who have deficits in mobility. We randomized a total of 412 adults aged 70–89 years at elevated risk for mobility disability to either a physical activity or a successful aging educational control intervention for 12 months. Participants in the physical activity intervention had more favorable changes in both outcomes as a result of treatment than those in the successful aging intervention. Gender, age, and scores on a short physical performance battery did not moderate these effects. Physical activity is an effective means of intervening on self-efficacy and satisfaction with physical function in older adults with impaired lower extremity functioning. This is an important finding in light of the importance of these process variables in behavior change and quality of life.

Last Modified: 11/23/2014
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