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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: The Effects of Three Module Types on Cotton Ginning and Fiber Quality

Authors
item Byler, Richard
item Willcutt, M -
item Buschermohle, M -
item Mayfield, W -
item Barnes, E -

Submitted to: ASABE Annual International Meeting
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: June 19, 2009
Publication Date: July 15, 2009
Repository URL: http:////asae.frymulti.com/azdez.asp?JID=5&AID=27422&CID=reno2009&T=2
Citation: Byler, R.K., Willcutt, M.H., Buschermohle, M.J., Mayfield, W.D., Barnes, E.M. 2009. The Effects of Three Module Types on Cotton Ginning and Fiber Quality. ASABE Annual International Meeting. Paper No. 096826 9p.

Interpretive Summary: Recently seed cotton has been stored in modules from the time it was harvested until it was ginned. These modules have been formed using additional equipment and operators. In an effort to improve the efficiency of cotton production by reducing the number of operators and equipment, two newer harvesters have been produced which form modules on the harvester. These modules are smaller than the traditional modules, one being an approximately half-sized rectangular module and the other with round cross section holding approximately one fourth the seed cotton of a traditional module. Data and samples were obtained at seven gins located in four states to determine if significant problems in ginning were related to the newer modules. Cotton degradation was observed after considerable rainfall when loose seed cotton was placed at the ends of modules and when modules were stored closer together than recommended by the manufacturers. Small differences in seed cotton moisture content and ginning rate between the module types were observed at several of the gins. Cotton lint quality measurements were obtained at one gin which had experienced considerable rainfall and small differences in color were related to the module type. The round modules had seed cotton with better moisture levels, lint with better color, and they were processed somewhat more rapidly by the gin than with the other module types. However, because the variety, growth conditions, and harvest conditions of the seed cotton was uncontrolled the differences observed were too small to be able to conclude that the use of the different module types caused the differences. If ginning problems were related to the module types they were relatively minor. The newer module types did not present any significant problems in ginning.

Technical Abstract: Recently seed cotton has been stored in modules from the time it was harvested until it was ginned. These modules have been formed using additional equipment and operators. In an effort to improve the efficiency of cotton production by reducing the number of operators and equipment, two newer harvesters have been produced which form modules on the harvester. These modules are smaller than the traditional modules, one being an approximately half-sized rectangular module and the other with round cross section holding approximately one fourth the seed cotton of a traditional module. Data and samples were obtained at seven gins located in four states to determine if significant problems in ginning were related to the newer modules. Cotton degradation was observed when loose seed cotton was placed at the ends of modules and when modules were stored closer together than recommended by the manufacturers. Small differences in seed cotton moisture content and ginning rate between the module types were observed at several of the gins. Bale classification data were obtained at one gin and small differences in color were related to the module type. The round modules produced seed cotton with better moisture levels, lint with better color, and they were processed somewhat more rapidly by the gin then with the other module types. However, because the variety, growth conditions, and harvest conditions of the seed cotton was uncontrolled between the modules the differences observed were too small to be able to conclude that the differences were related to the use of the different module types and not due to other factors. If ginning problems are related to the module types they were relatively small. The newer module types did not present any significant problems in ginning.

Last Modified: 12/21/2014
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