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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: BIOLOGICALLY-BASED TECHNOLOGIES FOR MANAGEMENT OF CROP INSECT PESTS IN LOCAL AND AREA-WIDE PROGRAMS Title: Acoustic detection of Oryctes rhinoceros (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Dynastinae) and Nasutitermes luzonicus (Isoptera: Termitidae) in palm trees of urban Guam

Authors
item Mankin, Richard
item Moore, M -

Submitted to: Journal of Economic Entomology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: November 21, 2009
Publication Date: August 1, 2010
Citation: Mankin, R.W., Moore, M. 2010. Acoustic detection of Oryctes rhinoceros (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Dynastinae) and Nasutitermes luzonicus (Isoptera: Termitidae) in palm trees of urban Guam. Journal of Economic Entomology. 103:1135-1143.

Interpretive Summary: Scientists at the Center for Medical, Agricultural, and Veterinary Entomology, and the University of Guam collected and analyzed sounds produced by the coconut rhinoceros beetle in palm trees in Guam. This beetle recently invaded Guam and APHIS is attempting to help Guam authorities eradicate it. The adults of this beetle cause great economic damage and can kill coconut palms. They are difficult to find visually because they attack the tops of the trees. This study demonstrated, however, that their movement and feeding sounds can be detected over long distances in a tree, and acoustic sensors could be used to detect hidden infestations and distinguish these insects from others commonly found in palms. Acoustic sensors are now being used in the program to eradicate the coconut rhinoceros beetle. Coconut palms found to be infested are being removed or treated with insecticide.

Technical Abstract: Adult and larval Oryctes rhinoceros (L) (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Dynastinae) were acoustically detected in live and dead palm trees and logs in recently invaded areas of Guam, along with Nasutitermes (Isoptera: Termitidae), and other small, sound-producing invertebrates and invertebrates. The sounds produced by large, active O. rhinoceros had distinctive spectral and temporal patterns that facilitated their identification and discrimination from background noise, as well as from termites, roaches, earwigs, and other small sound-producing organisms present in the trees and logs. Acoustic instruments are expected to continue in use as detection tools in surveillance activities of Guam’s O. rhinoceros eradication program.

Last Modified: 12/19/2014
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