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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: SUNFLOWER GERMPLASM DEVELOPMENT FOR IMPROVED INSECT AND DISEASE RESISTANCE

Location: Sunflower Research

Title: Resistance Among Cultivated Sunflower Germplasm to the Banded Sunflower Moth (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) in the Northern Great Plains

Authors
item Charlet, Laurence
item Seiler, Gerald
item Miller, Jerry -
item Hulke, Brent
item Knodel, Janet -

Submitted to: Helia
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: October 15, 2009
Publication Date: December 1, 2009
Citation: Charlet, L.D., Seiler, G.J., Miller, J.F., Hulke, B.S., Knodel, J.J. 2009. Resistance Among Cultivated Sunflower Germplasm to the Banded Sunflower Moth (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) in the Northern Great Plains. Helia. 32:1-10.

Interpretive Summary: A five year field study evaluated 71 oilseed sunflower accessions, 32 breeding lines, and 25 interspecific crosses for resistance to infestation by naturally occurring populations of the banded sunflower moth in North Dakota. Germplasm with resistance to attack by the banded sunflower moth and subsequent larval feeding damage in the seeds was identified. PI 251902 had less than 10% feeding damage per head in all five years of testing and less than 6% in three of the five years. PI 372259 and PI 170401 exhibited 12% or less seed damage in three years of evaluation and PI 253776 had only 3% damage in two of the three years and was the least damaged in 2004. Four other accessions (PI 170385, PI 291403, PI 494859, and PI 505651) revealed resistance in three of five years. A number of the interspecific crosses which were retested based on earlier results showed reduced seed damage in 2003, but subsequently exhibited much greater damage the following year due to higher populations of banded sunflower moth. Hybrid 894 was earlier used by others as a susceptible check; however, in the current investigation, this hybrid consistently had the lowest average seed damage from C. hospes feeding among the germplasm evaluated. Results from this investigation indicate that there is potential for developing resistant genotypes with reduced feeding injury that will help sunflower producers reduce yield loss due to the banded sunflower moth. In addition, plant resistance can effectively be combined with delayed planting to decrease densities of the moth thus reducing crop losses without disrupting the control of the larvae by naturally occurring parasites.

Technical Abstract: A five year field trial evaluated 71 oilseed sunflower, Helianthus annuus L., accessions, 32 breeding lines, and 25 interspecific crosses for resistance to infestation by naturally occurring populations of the banded sunflower moth, Cochylis hospes Walsingham (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae), in North Dakota. Germplasm with resistance to attack by the banded sunflower moth and subsequent larval feeding damage in the seeds was identified. PI 251902 had less than 10% feeding damage per head in all five years of testing and less than 6% in three of the five years. PI 372259 and PI 170401 exhibited 12% or less seed damage in three years of evaluation and PI 253776 had only 3% damage in two of the three years and was the least damaged in 2004. Four other accessions (PI 170385, PI 291403, PI 494859, and PI 505651) revealed resistance in three of five years. A number of the interspecific crosses which were retested based on earlier results showed reduced seed damage in 2003, but subsequently exhibited much greater damage the following year due to higher populations of banded sunflower moth. Hybrid 894 was earlier used by others as a susceptible check; however, in the current investigation, this hybrid consistently had the lowest average seed damage from C. hospes feeding among the germplasm evaluated. Results from this investigation indicate that there is potential for developing resistant genotypes with reduced feeding injury that will help sunflower producers reduce yield loss due to the banded sunflower moth. In addition, plant resistance can effectively be combined with delayed planting to decrease densities of C. hospes, thus reducing crop losses without disrupting the control of the larvae by parasitoids.

Last Modified: 7/23/2014
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