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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: UNDERSTANDING PHOSPHORUS CHEMISTRY IN MANURE AND SOIL AND THEIR INTERACTIONS TO TREAT AND CONTROL PHOSPHORUS MOVEMENT IN THE ENVIRONMENT Title: Effects of soil texture and land use interactions on organic carbon in soils in North China cities' urban fringe

Authors
item Kong, Xiangbin -
item Dao, Thanh
item Qin, Jing -
item Qin, Haiyi -

Submitted to: Geoderma
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: September 30, 2009
Publication Date: October 24, 2009
Repository URL: http://DOI:10.1016/j.geoderma.2009.09.016
Citation: Kong, X., Dao, T.H., Qin, J., Qin, H. 2009. Effects of soil texture and land use interactions on organic carbon in soils in North China cities' urban fringe. Geoderma. 154(1-2):86-92.

Interpretive Summary: Soil organic matter is the soil nutrient pool and changes of the quantity of SOM often reflect changes in soil fertility. Soil OM stabilizes soil pH, which plays a vital role in controlling the supply of nutrients and their availability for plant uptake. Levels of accumulation of SOM depend essentially on tillage methods and residue management practices. Land use change and changes in soil management practices often occur together and have profound influences on the soil physical, chemical, and biological environment. Limited information exists on the joint effects of soil texture and land use on carbon (C) storage efficiency. Organic C in soils at the rural-urban interface was determined in benchmark soil texture classes in the North China Plain’s Daxing district in 1982, 2000, and 2006. The results suggested that soil texture played a key role in attaining elevated SOC concentrations in different land use types and management intensity. The order of increasing SOC concentrations across land use types was fine sand Technical Abstract: Limited information exists on the effects of the linkages between soil texture and land use on C storage efficiency. Organic C concentration in soils at the rural-urban interface were measured in 1982, 2000, and 2006 to determine controlling factors and optimal land use type to enhance soil organic C (SOC) storage in benchmark soil textural classes in the North China Plain’s Daxing district. The results suggested that soil texture was the key to attaining elevated SOC concentrations in different land use types and management intensity. From 1982 to 2006, the order of increasing SOC concentrations across land use types was fine sand <sand loam < light loam < middle loam. Since 1982, the practice of returning crop residues to the soil has been beneficial to C storage in agricultural soils across the district. Diversification of land uses was extensive since 2000, but only the wheat-maize (WM) system has maintained elevated SOC concentrations across a wide range of soil texture classes. Differential declines in SOC concentrations were observed in most other land uses that included vegetables (V), watermelon, economic crops (CC), fruits, rice, and spring maize production. As demands for secure and diverse sources of food grows, land use sequences to rotate between WM and CC or V types may maintain the delicate balance between high-value production and net SOC storage. Judicious planning of land use sequences and strict observance of recommended management practices are needed to sustain production and maintain SOC concentrations at a high equilibrium in the North China Plain.

Last Modified: 8/30/2014
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