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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: PEST BIOLOGY, ECOLOGY, AND INTEGRATED PEST MANAGEMENT FOR SUSTAINABLE AGRICULTURE

Location: North Central Agricultural Research Laboratory

Title: Recent Records of Adalia Bipunctata (L.), Coccinella Transversoguttata Richardsoni Brown and, Coccinella Novemnotata Herbst (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) from South Dakota and Nebraska

Authors
item Hesler, Louis
item Losey, John -
item Catangui, Michael -
item Helbig, J -
item Mesman, Amy -

Submitted to: The Coleopterists Bulletin
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: July 23, 2009
Publication Date: December 29, 2009
Citation: Hesler, L.S., Losey, J.E., Catangui, M.A., Helbig, J.B., Mesman, A. 2009. Recent Records of Adalia Bipunctata (L.), Coccinella Transversoguttata Richardsoni Brown and, Coccinella Novemnotata Herbst (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) from South Dakota and Nebraska. The Coleopterists Bulletin 63(4):475-484.

Interpretive Summary: The two-spotted, transverse and nine-spotted lady beetles were previously common throughout much of North America, but their numbers have declined drastically over the last few decades. This paper reports on recent findings of these species at eight sites in western South Dakota and western Nebraska in 2008. Nine two-spotted lady beetles, 11 transverse lady beetles and 12 nine-spotted lady beetles were among 930 lady beetles sampled overall. In several instances, adult transverse lady beetles and C. novemnotata were observed often on the same plants with other lady beetles, especially the convergent lady beetle, a native species, and the seven-spotted lady beetles, a non-native species. In addition, one adult transverse lady beetle was found on a yellow sticky trap during a survey for cereal leaf beetle in a winter wheat field, Butte County, South Dakota, in 2000. Seven-spotted lady beetles were observed feeding upon two kinds of native aphids, providing additional records of predation by this coccinellid on non-target, native prey. The results are discussed with respect to other recent discoveries of the two-spotted, transverse and nine-spotted lady beetles and in relation to future research and conservation efforts.

Technical Abstract: Adalia bipunctata (L.), Coccinella transversoguttata richardsoni Brown, and C. novemnotata Herbst (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) were previously common throughout much of North America, but their numbers have declined drastically over the last few decades. This paper reports on recent findings of these species at eight sites in western South Dakota and western Nebraska in 2008. Nine A. bipunctata, 11 C. transversoguttata richardsoni and 12 C. novemnotata were among 930 coccinellids sampled overall. In several instances, adult C. transversoguttata richardsoni and C. novemnotata were observed often on the same plants with other coccinellids, especially Hippodamia convergens Guérin-Méneville, a native species, and Coccinella septempunctata L., a non-native species. In addition, one adult C. transversoguttata richardsoni was found on a yellow sticky trap during a survey for cereal leaf beetle in a winter wheat field, Butte County, South Dakota, in 2000. Coccinella septempunctata was observed feeding upon two native aphids, Aphis helianthi Monell and Uroleucon atripes (Gillette and Palmer), providing additional records of predation by this coccinellid on non-target, native prey. The results are discussed with respect to other recent discoveries of A. bipunctata, C. transversoguttata richardsoni and C. novemnotata and in relation to future research and conservation efforts.

Last Modified: 8/22/2014
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