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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: SUNFLOWER GERMPLASM DEVELOPMENT FOR IMPROVED INSECT AND DISEASE RESISTANCE

Location: Sunflower Research

Title: 2008 Sunflower Insect Trap Monitoring Network

Authors
item Knodel, Janet -
item Charlet, Laurence

Submitted to: Meeting Proceedings
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: March 30, 2009
Publication Date: March 30, 2009
Repository URL: http://www.sunflowernsa.com/research/research-workshop/documents/Knodel_InsectTrap_09.pdf
Citation: Knodel, J.J., Charlet, L.D. 2009. 2008 Sunflower Insect Trap Monitoring Network. Proceedings 31st Sunflower Research Workshop, National Sunflower Association, January 13-14, 2009, Fargo, ND. Available: http://www.sunflowernsa.com/research/research-workshop/documents/Knodel_InsectTrap_09.pdf

Interpretive Summary: A regional insect trap network was developed by the National Sunflower Association, USDA-ARS, and North Dakota State University Extension Service to monitor for two major insect pests of sunflower in 2008 including the sunflower moth, Homoeosoma electellum (Hulst) (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) and the banded sunflower moth, Cochylis hospes Walsingham (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae). Sunflower moth overwinters in the southern United States and migrates northward through the Great Plains during the growing season. Moths can reach the northern Great Plains by early to late July. Pheromone traps are used to monitor moth arrival and population build-up. The banded sunflower moth overwinters in the upper Great Plains and has one generation per year. Adults emerge about mid-July and are present in the field until mid-August. Pheromone traps are used to monitor for moth emergence and to determine population densities. Forty cooperators from seven states (North Dakota, South Dakota, Minnesota, Nebraska, Kansas, Oklahoma, and Texas) and one Canadian province (Manitoba) participated in the sunflower insect trapping network in 2008. Weekly trapping results were posted on the National Sunflower Association and the University Extension Entomology websites and provided real-time trap data throughout the growing season. Maps were generated using ARCGIS and placed on the websites for use by sunflower growers, crop consultants, extension specialists, field scouts and agronomists. The insect trap network was an effective method for monitoring banded sunflower moth and sunflower moth on a regional level. Trap data provided real-time information on the presence or absence of moths and their relative population densities. Trap cooperators, sunflower producers, seed company representatives and IPM scouts were satisfied with the trapping information and in many cases it assisted them in making important pest management decisions. We plan to continue and increase the number of trapping sites in the regional trapping network in 2009.

Technical Abstract: A regional insect trap network was developed by the National Sunflower Association, USDA-ARS, and North Dakota State University Extension Service to monitor for two major insect pests of sunflower in 2008 including the sunflower moth, Homoeosoma electellum (Hulst) (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) and the banded sunflower moth, Cochylis hospes Walsingham (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae). Sunflower moth overwinters in the southern United States and migrates northward through the Great Plains during the growing season. Moths can reach the northern Great Plains by early to late July. Pheromone traps are used to monitor moth arrival and population build-up. The banded sunflower moth overwinters in the upper Great Plains and has one generation per year. Adults emerge about mid-July and are present in the field until mid-August. Pheromone traps are used to monitor for moth emergence and to determine population densities. Forty cooperators from seven states (North Dakota, South Dakota, Minnesota, Nebraska, Kansas, Oklahoma, and Texas) and one Canadian province (Manitoba) participated in the sunflower insect trapping network in 2008. Weekly trapping results were posted on the National Sunflower Association and the University Extension Entomology websites and provided real-time trap data throughout the growing season. Maps were generated using ARCGIS and placed on the websites for use by sunflower growers, crop consultants, extension specialists, field scouts and agronomists. The insect trap network was an effective method for monitoring banded sunflower moth and sunflower moth on a regional level. Trap data provided real-time information on the presence or absence of moths and their relative population densities. Trap cooperators, sunflower producers, seed company representatives and IPM scouts were satisfied with the trapping information and in many cases it assisted them in making important pest management decisions. We plan to continue and increase the number of trapping sites in the regional trapping network in 2009.

Last Modified: 8/22/2014
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