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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: MANAGEMENT TECHNOLOGIES FOR ARID RANGELANDS Title: Setting the stage to enhance ecological site description appplications to wildlife management in sagebrush ecosystems: A 2007 society for range management workshop

Authors
item Wendell, Gilgert -
item Brown, Joel -

Submitted to: Society for Range Management Meeting Abstracts
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: February 2, 2009
Publication Date: February 8, 2009
Citation: Wendell, G., Brown, J. 2009. Setting the stage to enhance ecological site description appplications to wildlife management in sagebrush ecosystems: A 2007 society for range management workshop [abstract]. 62nd Society for Range Management Annual Meeting. Paper No. 1000-16.

Technical Abstract: Widespread loss, alteration and degradation of sagebrush ecosystems have created complex challenges for managers seeking to conserve dependent wildlife species. A half century of range and wildlife research has generated an extensive and diverse base of information to assist managers in making land management decisions. However, this information may not be readily available to managers. Thus, there exists a need to develop an interdisciplinary, transparent tool that organizes and communicates this information to decision makers. Ecological Site Descriptions (ESDs) constitute a viable management tool that potentially could improve range and wildlife managers’ capabilities to describe and manage sagebrush ecosystems. To set the stage for this transition, the Society for Range Management in concert with federal, state, and private partners sponsored a workshop in Park City, Utah in 2007. The objectives of workshop were to: 1) introduce habitat managers, planners and policy makers to the use and development of ESDs, 2) encourage interdisciplinary improvement of wildlife interpretations in ESDs and enhance the utility of this tool for managing sagebrush ecosystems, and 3) identify information gaps and define priorities for research and development. This workshop was attended by over 300 land and wildlife/habitat managers, biologists, range ecologists and soil scientists, technical assistance professionals, local sage grouse working group members, consultants, and petroleum industry representatives from throughout western North America. In this poster we describe the process used by SRM and its partners to plan, conduct, and evaluate this successful workshop.

Last Modified: 10/20/2014
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