Page Banner

United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: MANAGEMENT OF TEMPERATE FRUIT NUT AND SPECIALTY CROP GENETIC RESOURCES Title: The Influence of European and American Wild Germplasm in Hop Cultivars

Authors
item Peredo, Elena - UNIVERSIDAD DE OVIEDO
item Revilla, M. Angeles - UNIVERSIDAD DE OVIEDO
item Reed, Barbara
item Javornik, Branca - UNIVERSITY OF LJUBLJANA
item Cires, Eduardo - UNIVERSIDAD DE OVIEDO
item Prieto, Jose - UNIVERSIDAD DE OVIEDO
item Arroyo-Garcia, Rosa - DEPT DE BIOTECNOLOGICAL

Submitted to: Genetic Resources and Crop Evolution
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: November 3, 2009
Publication Date: August 15, 2010
Citation: Peredo, E., Revilla, M., Reed, B.M., Javornik, B., Cires, E., Prieto, J.A., Arroyo-Garcia, R. 2010. The Influence of European and American Wild Germplasm in Hop Cultivars. Genetic Resources and Crop Evolution. 57:575-586.

Interpretive Summary: Hops grown in the US and Europe are derived from native hop plants from those regions. This study determined the amount of European and American ancestry present in 182 hop cultivars and wild collected plants. The study included wild European (68), wild American (48), and named cultivars (66). Molecular techniques for nuclear and chloroplast DNA were used to determine the differences and similarieis of these groups. Two main groups were determined; one included European wild accessions and cultivars and a second group consisted of American wild accessions. A major influence of the wild European types was detected among all the hop cultivars. This is the first time that chloroplast DNA has been studied in hops.

Technical Abstract: Microsatellite variation at the nuclear and chloroplast genomes was evaluated for wild European and wild American hops, in order to assess the genetic diversity and origin of cultivated hops. Seven nuclear loci and 32 chloroplast loci were used in the analysis of 182 hop accessions including wild European (68), wild American (48), and cultivars (66). A total of 116 alleles were identified using 7 nuclear microsatellites showing different averages of polymorphism and distribution in the wild American and European accessions and cultivars. Two main groups were established as revealed by several statistical analyses; one including European wild accessions and cultivars and a second group consisting of American wild accessions. Three polymorphic chloroplast microsatellite loci were detected, six alleles were scored which defined a total of five haplotypes that were exclusive or presented different distribution between American and European wild accessions. A major influence of the wild European haplotypes was detected among hop cultivars. This is the first work reported using chloroplast microsatellites in hops.

Last Modified: 12/21/2014
Footer Content Back to Top of Page