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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: IMPROVED FORAGE AND BIOENERGY PLANTS AND TECHNOLOGIES FOR THE CENTRAL USA Title: A Multiple Species Approach to Biomass Production from Native Herbaceous Perennial Feedstocks

Authors
item Gonzalez-Hernandez, J - SOUTH DAKOTA STATE UNIV
item Sarath, Gautam
item Owens, V - SOUTH DAKOTA STATE UNIV
item Stein, J - SOUTH DAKOTA STATE UNIV
item Gedye, K - SOUTH DAKOTA STATE UNIV

Submitted to: In Vitro Cellular and Developmental Biology - Plants
Publication Type: Review Article
Publication Acceptance Date: February 27, 2009
Publication Date: May 28, 2009
Citation: Gonzalez-Hernandez, J., Sarath, G., Owens, V., Stein, J.M., Gedye, K. 2009. A Multiple Species Approach to Biomass Production from Native Herbaceous Perennial Feedstocks. In Vitro Cellular and Developmental Biology - Plants. 45:267-281.

Interpretive Summary: This review evaluates the potential biofuel potential of native herbaceous feedstocks other than switchgrass. Based on the existing literature the need to accelerate research in the areas of agronomy, breeding, genetics and potential pathogens in less-well known species is discussed with particular reference to prairie cordgrass (Spartina pectinata) and little bluestem (Schizachyrium scoparium).

Technical Abstract: Recent mandates to produce biofuels from cellulosic materials as well as global population increase will demand an increase of the agricultural production. Here we defend the need to produce lignocellulosic biomass in lands that are not well suited for conventional crop production, here thereafter referred as marginal lands. Much of these areas are located in the central prairies of North America once dominated by tall grass species. In this manuscript we review the existing literature and current work on some of these species as candidates for commercial production of biomass for bioenergy. Based on the existing literature we discuss the need to accelerate research in the areas of agronomy, breeding, genetics and potential pathogens. Diversified cropping systems are essential for a sustainable production and to mitigate impact of pathogens and pests. In particular we discuss the potential of two native species of the tall grass prairie, prairie cordgrass (Spartina pectinata) and little bluestem (Schizachyrium scoparium).

Last Modified: 11/22/2014
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