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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Aqueous 2% Geraniol as a mosquito repellent failed against Aedes Aegypti on ponies

Authors
item Reeves, Will
item Miller, Myrna

Submitted to: Journal of the American Mosquito Control Association
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: May 1, 2010
Publication Date: September 1, 2010
Citation: Reeves, W.K., Miller, M.M. 2010. Aqueous 2% Geraniol as a mosquito repellent failed against Aedes Aegypti on ponies. Vol 26:3,340-341.

Interpretive Summary: Organic insect repellents are of interest to many agricultural producers and animal owners. Geraniol, a plant extract, is naturally produced by many plants and is an EPA “minimum risk pesticide”. Previous studies have shown various concentrations of geraniol to repel or kill mosquitoes, but it might cause allergic contact dermatitis. We tested a commercially available solution of geraniol on ponies as a mosquito repellent. Five trials were conducted on 5 ponies. Treatment animals were treated with a 60 cc aerosol mist (30 cc per side) of geraniol. Animals were observed 3 hours post application to check for skin irritation. Mosquitoes in feeding tubes were held on the ponies for 7 minutes. The average percent of biting on control animals was 56% with a range of 16% to 90% and the average for the treatments was 13% with a range of 0% to 86%. Based on statistical models there was no significant difference in the proportion of bites between treated and untreated animals after 3 hours. Based on our data, 2% geraniol was not an adequate mosquito repellent for horses. We did not observe any skin irritation on the animals treated with 2% geraniol. A higher concentration of geraniol might protect against mosquitoes.

Technical Abstract: Organic insect repellents are of interest to many agricultural producers and animal owners. Geraniol, a plant-derived alcohol is naturally produced by a wide range of plants and is an EPA “minimum risk pesticide”. Previous studies have shown various concentrations of geraniol to repel or kill mosquitoes, but it might cause allergic contact dermatitis. We tested a commercially available 2% aqueous solution of geraniol on ponies as a mosquito repellent. Five trials were conducted on 5 ponies. Treatment animals were treated with a 60 ml aerosol mist (30 ml per side) of 2% geraniol. Animals were observed 3 h post application to check for skin irritation. Aedes aegpti in feeding tubes were held on the ponies for 7 min. The average percent of biting on control animals was 56% with a range of 16% to 90% and the average for the treatments was 13% with a range of 0% to 86%. Based on statistical models there was no significant difference (P= 0.081) in the proportion of bites between treated and untreated animals after 3 h. Based on our data, 2% geraniol was not an adequate mosquito repellent for horses. We did not observe any skin irritation on the animals treated with 2% geraniol. A higher concentration of geraniol might protect against mosquitoes.

Last Modified: 10/23/2014
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