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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT FACILITATING BOVINE GENOME SEQUENCE USE TO IMPROVE CATTLE PRODUCTION EFFICIENCY, PRODUCT QUALITY & ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT

Location: Genetics, Breeding, & Animal Health

Title: Association of Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms in the CAST Gene Associated with Longissimus Tenderness in Beef Cattle

Authors
item CASAS, EDUARDO
item WHEELER, TOMMY
item SHACKELFORD, STEVEN
item BENNETT, GARY
item SMITH, TIMOTHY

Submitted to: Journal of Animal Science Supplement
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: March 4, 2009
Publication Date: July 12, 2009
Citation: Casas, E., Wheeler, T.L., Shackelford, S.D., Bennett, G.L., Smith, T.P.L. 2009. Association of Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms in the CAST Gene Associated with Longissimus Tenderness in Beef Cattle [abstract]. Journal of Animal Science Supplement. 87(E-Suppl. 2):533. Abstract #628.

Technical Abstract: The objective was to assess the association of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) developed on the CAST gene, with longissimus tenderness. Forty one SNP were identified in the CAST gene and assays were developed. Markers were scattered throughout the gene. These markers, in conjunction with a commercially available SNP, were evaluated in a Bos taurus population (n = 556) that included crossbred animals derived from Hereford, Angus, Red Angus, Limousin, Charolais, Gelbvieh, and Simmental sires. The trait evaluated was longissimus tenderness measured as Warner-Bratzler shear force (kg). Of the 41 SNP developed, 21 were significantly (P < 0.05) associated with longissimus tenderness. The minor allele frequency (MAF) of the commercially available marker in this population was 0.20. Eleven of the 21 SNP, significantly associated with longissimus tenderness, had an average MAF = 0.366. The other 10 SNP significantly associated with longissimus tenderness, had an average MAF = 0.183. The 11 SNP with an average MAF = 0.366 had an additive effect. Animals homozygous for the allele with the lowest frequency had tougher longissimus than animals homozygous for the alternate allele. The average significance for these 11 SNP was P = 0.032. The commercially available marker had a dominant effect, where heterozygous animals had similar longissimus tenderness as homozygous animals with the MAF allele. These two groups of animals had tougher longissimus than those homozygous for the alternate allele (P = 0.001). The 10 SNP with an average MAF = 0.183 showed similar performance in longissimus tenderness as the commercially available marker. The average significance for these 10 SNP was P = 0.004. When evaluated in additional populations and their effects validated, these markers could be used as alternate candidates to characterize variation of longissimus tenderness in beef cattle.

Last Modified: 7/25/2014
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