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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Onion cultivar evaluation - Lane

Authors
item Shrefler, James - OSU, LANE, OK
item Goodson, Tony - OSU, LANE, OK
item Webber, Charles

Submitted to: Extension Publications
Publication Type: Experiment Station
Publication Acceptance Date: January 25, 2009
Publication Date: February 7, 2009
Citation: Shrefler, J.W., Goodson, T.L., Webber III, C.L. 2009. Onion cultivar evaluation - Lane. In: Brandenberger, L., Wells, L., editors. 2008 Vegetable Trials Report, Oklahoma State University, Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources, Department of Horticulture & Landscape Architecture. Stillwater, OK. MP-164, p. 09-10.

Interpretive Summary: Onions are an important crop for growers selling at farmer's markets. Growers currently use a combination of short day and intermediate day cultivars. This practice extends the time period for transplanting and harvesting. The intermediate cultivars available to growers have been limited in number. Newly available intermediate cultivars may offer additional characteristics compared to those currently used. The objective of this study was to evaluate and compare onion cultivars for yield, bulb size distribution, and bolting potential using onion transplants locally produced with a hoop house production system. Onions were seeded Nov. 4, 2007 on 4 inch high beds on the floor of hoop houses located at Lane, OK. Twelve cultivars were used in the trial. On March 25 plants were dug and replanted outdoors. The field planting used 4 ft wide raised beds on 6 foot centers. Data collection included seed-stalk formation, bulb diameter and bulb weight. Plant bolting percentages were determined on May 30 and onions harvested in early July. Five cultivars within the top yielding group did not differ statistically from 'Sequoia,' which had the greatest yields. All cultivars produced some marketable yield. Onion bulbs larger than 4 inches in diameter were found only for cv. Chief, with 2% of bulbs being 4 inches or greater. There were no statistical differences among cultivars within the bulb diameter < 2 inches and 2-3 inch categories. All cultivars, except 'Red Bull,' had at least some bulbs in the 3-4 inch category. Fifty percent of 'Sequoia' bulbs were in the 3-4 inch category. Five additional cultivars fell within a group that did not differ from 'Sequoia' in percentage of 3-4 inch bulbs. Aside from these, no cultivar had more than an average of 16% of bulbs within the 3-4 inch category. The percentage of bolted plants ranged from 0 to 18%. 'Sequoia,' 'Renegade,' 'Denali,' 'Cimarron,' 'Chief' and 'White Wing' each produced at least 25% of bulbs with a 3 inch diameter or greater. Of this group, all cultivars are yellow with the exception of 'White Wing' which is white. Several of these cultivars may be useful for producers interested in using the hoop house transplant production system for onion production in Oklahoma.

Technical Abstract: Growers currently use a combination of short-day and intermediate-day onion cultivars to extend the time periods for transplanting and harvesting. The intermediate cultivars available to growers have been limited in Oklahoma. Newly available intermediate cultivars may offer additional characteristics compared to those currently used. The objective of this study was to evaluate and compare onion cultivars for yield, bulb size distribution, and bolting potential using onion transplants locally produced with a hoop house production system. Twelve cultivars were seeded Nov. 4, 2007 on 4 inch high beds in hoop houses located at Lane, OK. On March 25 plants were dug and replanted outdoors. The field planting used 4 ft wide raised beds on 6 ft centers. Plant bolting percentages were determined on May 30 and onions harvested in early July. Five cultivars within the top yielding group did not differ statistically from ‘Sequoia,' the cultivar with the largest yields. All cultivars produced some marketable yield. Onion bulbs larger than 4 inches were found only for 'Chief,' with 2% of bulbs 4 inches or greater. There were no statistical differences among cultivars in the < 2 inch and 2-3 inch bulb diameter categories. All cultivars, except 'Red Bull,' had at least some bulbs in the 3-4 inch category. Fifty percent of ‘Sequoia’ bulbs were in 3-4 inch category. Five additional cultivars fell did not differ from 'Sequoia' in percentage of 3-4 inch bulbs. Aside from these 5 cultivars, no cultivar had more than 16% of bulbs within the 3-4 inch category. The percentage of bolted plants ranged from 0 to 18%. Several of these cultivars may be useful for producers interested in using the hoop house transplant production system for onion production in Oklahoma.

Last Modified: 4/16/2014
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