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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: COUNTERMEASURES TO CONTROL AND ERADICATE RIFT VALLEY FEVER (RFV) Title: Readiness and Capacity of the U.S. for the Introduction of Exotic Arthropod-Borne Viruses

Authors
item Wilson, William
item Bennett, Kristine
item Mecham, James
item Miller, Myrna
item Reeves, Will
item Drolet, Barbara

Submitted to: Meeting Abstract
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: October 27, 2008
Publication Date: October 27, 2008
Citation: Wilson, W.C., Bennett, K.E., Mecham, J.O., Miller, M.M., Reeves, W.K., Drolet, B.S. 2008. Readiness and Capacity of the U.S. for the Introduction of Exotic Arthropod-Borne Viruses. U.S. Animal Health Association Conference, Greensboro, NC, October 24-29, 2008. PP. 220-221.

Interpretive Summary: Insect-transmitted diseases cause significant economic losses to U.S. and world agriculture. This paper discusses the current and potential impact of these viruses, as well as the readiness and capacity of U.S. diagnostic laboratories and veterinary workforce to deal with these emerging and re-emerging livestock diseases. Although it is impossible to predict what will be the next livestock disease introduction to or re-emergence in the U.S., many of the scientific tools and infrastructure outlined here would be applicable to diseases not currently targeted.

Technical Abstract: Arthropod-borne animal viruses (arboviruses) cause significant economic losses to U.S. and world agriculture. This paper discusses the current and potential impact of these viruses, as well as the readiness and capacity of U.S. diagnostic laboratories and veterinary workforce to deal with these emerging and re-emerging insect transmitted viruses affecting livestock and wildlife. The development of validated diagnostics and effective control strategies and the formulation of reasonable animal regulatory statutes to reduce the economic impact on U.S. livestock requires understanding the molecular biology, epidemiology and pathogenesis of these arboviruses. The economic impact resulting from a lack of readiness and capacity could further damage the current U.S. economy. Although it is impossible to predict what will be the next arboviral introduction to or re-emergence in the U.S., many of the scientific tools and infrastructure outlined here would be applicable to pathogens not currently targeted.

Last Modified: 12/22/2014
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