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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Dakota Diamond: An exceptionally high yielding, cold chipping potato cultivar with long-term storage potential

Authors
item Thompson, Asunta - NORTH DAKOTA STATE UNIV
item Farnsworth, Bryce - NORTH DAKOTA STATE UNIV
item Gudmestad, Neil - NORTH DAKOTA STATE UNIV
item Secor, Gary - NORTH DAKOTA STATE UNIV
item Preston, Duane - UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA
item Sowokinos, Joseph - UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA
item Glynn, Martin
item Hatterman-Valenti, Harlene - NORTH DAKOTA STATE UNIV

Submitted to: American Journal of Potato Research
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: March 20, 2008
Publication Date: April 29, 2008
Citation: Thompson, A.L., Farnsworth, B.L., Gudmestad, N.C., Secor, G.A., Preston, D., Sowokinos, J.R., Glynn, M.T., Hatterman-Valenti, H. 2008. Dakota Diamond: An exceptionally high yielding, cold chipping potato cultivar with long-term storage potential. American Journal of Potato Research. 85(3):171-182.

Interpretive Summary: Dakota Diamond (ND5822C-7) is a medium to late maturing cultivar with uniformly sized tubers and very high yield potential. It resulted from the cross of ND4103-2 and “Dakota Pearl”. Dakota Diamond is comprised of approximately 23.3% wild potato species germplasm. It combines the characteristics of several species, including Solanum tuberosum L. subsp. andigena Juz. and Bukasov, S. demissum Lindl., S. phureja Juz. and Bukasov, and purportedly, S. chacoense Bitter. Haulms are vigorous and large. Tubers are smooth and round, with bright white skin and white flesh. Dakota Diamond is suitable for the cold chip and fresh tablestock markets, both directly from the field and following storage at 7.2 degree C. Yield potential under both non-irrigated and irrigated conditions in North Dakota and Minnesota is very high, with total yield, US no. 1 yield, and percent US no. 1 tubers of Dakota Diamond superior to those of “Atlantic” and Dakota Pearl, commercially acceptable chip cultivars. Means yield for Dakota Diamond across these sites is 40.8 t ha-1. It is widely adapted based upon performance in the North Central Regional Potato Variety Trials and Snack Food Association/US Potato Board Trials. Dakota Diamond sets tuber slightly later than other commercially acceptable chip cultivars, but tubers size quickly. Dakota Diamond demonstrates resistance to common scab (Streptomyces scabies Thaxter) and to pink rot (Phytophthora erythroseptica Pethyb.), and preferential avoidance by Colorado potato beetle (Leptinotarsa decemlineata Say) in pest resistance screening evaluations. Dakota Diamond demonstrates resistance to most internal and external defects. It is susceptible to hollow heart, however, particularly in tubers over 283 g. Dakota Diamond expresses typical symptoms of PVYo. However, infection by PVYn and PVYn:o recombinant genotypes is difficult to detect visually. The specific gravity of Dakota Diamond is high, averaging 1.095 across irrigated and non-irrigated sites in North Dakota and Minnesota. Chip color reaches its optimal, and sugar levels reach the minimum in late January to early February when produced in northern locales, maintaining chip quality parameters throughout the late storage market window. Dakota Diamond is aptly named for its excellent attributes, including beautiful appearance, excellent chip quality particularly from late season storage, resistance to common scab, and exceptionally high yield potential, and in honor of the Diamond Jubilee, the 75th anniversary of the North Dakota State University potato breeding program part of the North Dakota Agricultural Experiment Station. Dakota Diamond was released by the North Dakota Agricultural Experiment Station on 1 December 2005.

Technical Abstract: Dakota Diamond (ND5822C-7) is a medium to late maturing cultivar with uniformly sized tubers and very high yield potential. It resulted from the cross of ND4103-2 and “Dakota Pearl”. Dakota Diamond is comprised of approximately 23.3% wild potato species germplasm. It combines the characteristics of several species, including Solanum tuberosum L. subsp. andigena Juz. and Bukasov, S. demissum Lindl., S. phureja Juz. and Bukasov, and purportedly, S. chacoense Bitter. Haulms are vigorous and large. Tubers are smooth and round, with bright white skin and white flesh. Dakota Diamond is suitable for the cold chip and fresh tablestock markets, both directly from the field and following storage at 7.2 degree C. Yield potential under both non-irrigated and irrigated conditions in North Dakota and Minnesota is very high, with total yield, US no. 1 yield, and percent US no. 1 tubers of Dakota Diamond superior to those of “Atlantic” and Dakota Pearl, commercially acceptable chip cultivars. Means yield for Dakota Diamond across these sites is 40.8 t ha-1. It is widely adapted based upon performance in the North Central Regional Potato Variety Trials and Snack Food Association/US Potato Board Trials. Dakota Diamond sets tuber slightly later than other commercially acceptable chip cultivars, but tubers size quickly. Dakota Diamond demonstrates resistance to common scab (Streptomyces scabies Thaxter) and to pink rot (Phytophthora erythroseptica Pethyb.), and preferential avoidance by Colorado potato beetle (Leptinotarsa decemlineata Say) in pest resistance screening evaluations. Dakota Diamond demonstrates resistance to most internal and external defects. It is susceptible to hollow heart, however, particularly in tubers over 283 g. Dakota Diamond expresses typical symptoms of PVYo. However, infection by PVYn and PVYn:o recombinant genotypes is difficult to detect visually. The specific gravity of Dakota Diamond is high, averaging 1.095 across irrigated and non-irrigated sites in North Dakota and Minnesota. Chip color reaches its optimal, and sugar levels reach the minimum in late January to early February when produced in northern locales, maintaining chip quality parameters throughout the late storage market window. Dakota Diamond is aptly named for its excellent attributes, including beautiful appearance, excellent chip quality particularly from late season storage, resistance to common scab, and exceptionally high yield potential, and in honor of the Diamond Jubilee, the 75th anniversary of the North Dakota State University potato breeding program part of the North Dakota Agricultural Experiment Station. Dakota Diamond was released by the North Dakota Agricultural Experiment Station on 1 December 2005.

Last Modified: 9/10/2014
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