Page Banner

United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: INVESTIGATING THE IMPACT OF STRESS ON FOODBORNE PATHOGEN COLONIZATION IN TURKEYS

Location: Poultry Production and Products Safety Research

Title: Keynote symposium - avian influenza: Vectors, vaccines, public health, and product marketability introduction and welcome

Author
item HUFF, GERALDINE

Submitted to: Poultry Science
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: November 29, 2008
Publication Date: April 1, 2009
Citation: Huff, G.R. 2009. Keynote symposium - avian influenza: Vectors, vaccines, public health, and product marketability introduction and welcome. Poultry Science. 88(4):835-836.

Interpretive Summary: This symposium will provide the Poultry Science Association with up-to-date information concerning avian influenza virus (AIV).Avian influenza is a respiratory disease of birds that has always been a health problem for the poultry industry. Avian influenza occurs in many wild and domestic avian species in both low pathogenicity and occasionally high pathogenicity (HP) forms. Highly pathogenic AIV can cause severe economic losses and trade restrictions. In 1996 an HP H5N1 strain was detected in birds in China, and since then has been associated with extensive losses in poultry as well as mortality in humans who have close contact with affected poultry. This strain has become endemic in many Southeast Asian and Equatorial African countries and has been sporadically detected in Europe. While the Asian H5N1 HPAIV strain has not reached North America, other avian pathogenic strains continue to cause disease in poultry. The topics selected for the symposium are organized into sessions defined by the title: vectors, vaccines, public health, and marketability. While the spread of the H5N1HPAIV strain to the United States would devastate the poultry industry, the highly pathogenic strains already circulating in the United States and Canada already result in great economic loss not only to the disease, but to containment measures and trade restrictions. Our speakers will provide PSA members and guests with the most recent information concerning surveillance and vaccination methods for highly pathogenic AI strains, focusing on the molecular epidemiology and ecology of AIV in wild birds, and the development of rapid molecular diagnostic tests and novel vaccination strategies. We have also included experts in the areas of public health and epidemiology and extension experts with ideas about how to reduce the economic impacts of AI outbreaks.

Technical Abstract: This paper is the introduction to the Keynote Symposium titled “Avian Influenza: Vectors, Vaccines, Public Health, and Product Marketability” that the author organized for the Poultry Science Association (PSA) on July 20, 2008. The purpose of the symposium was to provide the members and guests of PSA with an overview of current research on avian influenza virus (AIV) and with knowledge and resources that will be needed in the event of an influenza outbreak. Avian influenza is a respiratory disease of birds that has always been a health problem for the poultry industry. Avian influenza occurs in many wild and domestic avian species in both low pathogenicity and occasionally high pathogenicity (HP) forms. Highly pathogenic AIV can cause severe economic losses and trade restrictions. In 1996 an HP H5N1 strain was detected in birds in China, and since then has been associated with extensive losses in poultry as well as mortality in humans who have close contact with affected poultry. This strain has become endemic in many Southeast Asian and Equatorial African countries and has been sporadically detected in Europe. While the Asian H5N1 HPAIV strain has not reached North America, other avian pathogenic strains continue to cause disease in poultry. The topics selected for the symposium are organized into sessions defined by the title: vectors, vaccines, public health, and marketability. While the spread of the H5N1 HPAIV strain to the United States would devastate the poultry industry, the highly pathogenic strains already circulating in the United States and Canada already result in great economic loss not only to the disease, but to containment measures and trade restrictions. Our speakers will provide PSA members and guests with the most recent information concerning surveillance and vaccination methods for highly pathogenic AI strains, focusing on the molecular epidemiology and ecology of AIV in wild birds, and the development of rapid molecular diagnostic tests and novel vaccination strategies. We have also included experts in the areas of public health and epidemiology and extension experts with ideas about how to reduce the economic impacts of AI outbreaks.

Last Modified: 9/10/2014
Footer Content Back to Top of Page