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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: DEVELOPMENT AND CHARACTERIZATION OF GENETIC RESOURCES FOR AGRONOMIC AND QUALITY TRAITS USING GENOMIC TOOLS Title: Effect of fertilizer source and rotation on grain quality in non-flooded rice

Authors
item Bryant, Rolfe
item Anders, Merle - UNIV. OF AR RREC

Submitted to: American Association of Cereal Chemists Meetings
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: September 1, 2008
Publication Date: September 15, 2008
Citation: Bryant, R.J., Anders, M.M. 2008. Effect of fertilizer source and rotation on grain quality in non-flooded rice [abstract]. American Association of Cereal Chemists Meetings, September 21-24, 2008, Honolulu, HI. Cereal Foods World 53:A22.

Technical Abstract: Water use is becoming a major issue in rice production. One way farmers are trying to conserve water is by growing rice in irrigated rows instead of permanent flooding. There is no information as to the affect that this management practice will have on rice grain quality. Also, urea which is used as a nitrogen source in rice production is very volatile and may be lost if it is applied to a wetted soil surface. CLXL 730 was grown under flooded conditions and in irrigated rows using urea, Agrotain, and a slow-release N fertilizer. In another study, CLXL 730 was grown under flooded conditions and in irrigated rows in two different rotation systems. Growing rice in rows was associated with a decrease in gelatinization temperature, and an increase protein content in the grain. It also was associated with a change in the Rapid Viscoâ„¢ Analyser (RVA) profile by decreasing the peak, trough, and final viscosities. Breakdown viscosity was also reduced. Planting rice in rows had no affect on apparent amylose content or setback. Type of fertilizer used had no affect on any of the parameters tested. Therefore, planting rice in irrigated rows may affect the protein content and therefore, cooking quality (RVA and gelatinization temperature) as compared to permanent flood conditions. However, using slow-release N fertilizer or Agrotain over urea had no affect on protein content in the grain or cooking quality.

Last Modified: 10/25/2014
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