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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: PROTECTION OF SUBTROPICAL AND TROPICAL AGRICULTURE COMMODITIES AND ORNAMENTALS FROM EXOTIC INSECTS

Location: Subtropical Horticulture Research

Title: Removal of Putrescine from a Food-Based Synthetic Attractant and Capture of Sterile Medflies

Authors
item Heath, Robert
item Epsky, Nancy
item Midgarden, D - USDA, APHIS-IS
item Holler, T - USDA, APHIS, PPQ

Submitted to: Fruit Flies of the Western Hemisphere
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: November 4, 2008
Publication Date: November 4, 2008
Citation: Heath, R.R., Epsky, N.D., Midgarden, D.G., Holler, T.C. 2008. Removal of Putrescine from a Food-Based Synthetic Attractant and Capture of Sterile Medflies. Fruit Flies of the Western Hemisphere.

Technical Abstract: Field trials were conducted in Guatemala and in Florida to compare capture of sterile tsl medfly males in traps baited with ammonium acetate, trimethylamine and putrescine with capture in traps baited with ammonium acetate and trimethylamine (i.e., putrescine deleted from three component food-based synthetic attractant). Tests in Guatemala evaluated medflies released under standard aerial protocols, and compared capture in Multilure traps and in open-bottom dry traps (baited with food-based synthetics) with capture in TML-baited Jackson traps. Low numbers of males were recaptured, with highest capture in Jackson traps (5.5 males per trap per day). Removal of putrescine significantly decreased capture of sterile males in Multilure traps, and slightly decreased capture in open-bottom dry traps. In Florida, capture of ground-released sterile males was evaluated in small-scale tests using Multilure traps only. Higher numbers of males were recaptured in these tests, and removal of putrescine had no effect. Relationships among captures in Jackson traps with trimedlure versus Multilure traps with ammonium acetate and trimethylamine with and without putrescine should be tested under target environmental conditions to determine if sterile medfly capture is sufficient to meet needs for accessing sterile fly distribution. However, deletion of putrescine in traps used for detection of new invasions may compromise effectiveness of those traps for detection of new invasions in pest-free areas. Delay in detection of new invasions will result in increased costs for control and eradication that would offset cost savings from deleting the putrescine from the synthetic attractant.

Last Modified: 9/2/2014
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