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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Effect of temperature on larval sunshine bass growth and survival to the fingerling stage

Authors
item Ludwig, Gerald
item Lochmann, Steve - UAPB

Submitted to: North American Journal of Aquaculture
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: May 3, 2009
Publication Date: July 27, 2009
Citation: Ludwig, G.M., Lochmann, S.E. 2009. Effect of temperature on larval sunshine bass growth and survival to the fingerling stage. North American Journal of Aquaculture. 71:260-266.

Interpretive Summary: Determining the optimum conditions for tank culture of sunshine bass fingerlings will facilitate a year-round supply of seed for the production cycle of this increasingly popular food fish. This experiment determined the relationship between temperature and larval sunshine bass growth and survival to the time when fish were trained to accept commercial feeds. Four-day post-hatch (dph) larvae were stocked at five temperatures from 20 degrees - 32° degrees at 3 degrees C increments. The larvae were first fed rotifers, then brine shrimp nauplii and later commercial feed. The temperature that provided maximum yield was 23.1 degrees C. Growth was faster at warmer temperatures but relative survival and yield were not. These relationships between tank culture conditions and production characteristics support optimization of tank culture to meet specific production goals. This should eliminate some of the logistical constraints to expanded tank culture of sunshine bass fingerlings.

Technical Abstract: Determining the optimum conditions for tank culture of sunshine bass fingerlings will facilitate a year-round supply of seed for the production cycle of this increasingly popular food fish. This experiment determined the relationship between temperature and larval sunshine bass growth and survival to the time when fish were trained to accept commercial feeds. Four-day post-hatch (dph) larvae were stocked at five temperatures from 20 degrees - 32 degrees C at 3 degrees C increments. There were two replicates of each temperature. The larvae were fed rotifers through 8 dph. Conversion to an Artemia nauplii diet began at 6 dph and training to dry starter feed began at 20 dph. At harvest, average total length and average weight of the fish increased in a linear relationship with temperature while relative survival and number of fish harvested decreased linearly with temperature. Tank yield had a curvilinear relationship with temperature. The temperature that provided maximum yield was 23.1 degrees C. Although growth was faster at warmer temperatures, relative survival and yield were not. These relationships between tank culture conditions and production characteristics support optimization of tank culture to meet specific production goals. This should eliminate some of the logistical constraints to expanded tank culture of sunshine bass fingerlings.

Last Modified: 12/21/2014
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