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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: INTEGRATED MANAGEMENT AND ECOLOGY OF WEED POPULATIONS IN THE SOUTHEASTERN COASTAL PLAIN

Location: Crop Protection and Management Research

Title: Annual grass control in strip-tillage peanut production with delayed applications of pendimethalin

Authors
item Johnson, Wiley
item Prostko, E - UNIV OF GA
item Mullinix, JR., B - LUBBOCK, TX

Submitted to: Weed Technology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: July 27, 2009
Publication Date: January 5, 2010
Citation: Johnson, W.C., Prostko, E.P., Mullinix, Jr. B.G. 2010. Annual grass control in strip-tillage peanut production with delayed applications of pendimethalin. Weed Technology. 24:1-5.

Interpretive Summary: In strip-tillage systems, situations arise where dinitroaniline herbicides are not applied in a timely manner to peanut. In these cases, dinitroaniline herbicides would be applied days or weeks after planting. However, there is no information that documents the effects of delayed applications on weed control. Trials were initiated in 2004 in Tifton, GA to determine the weed control efficacy of delayed applications of pendimethalin in strip-tillage peanut production. Treatments were all possible combinations of seven times of pendimethalin application and three herbicide tank-mixtures with pendimethalin. Times of pendimethalin application were preemergence (PRE) immediately after seeding, vegetative emergence (VE) of peanut, 1-wk after VE (VE+1wk), VE+2wk, VE+3wk, VE+4wk, and a control not treated with pendimethalin. Herbicide combinations evaluated were paraquat plus pendimethalin, imazapic plus pendimethalin, and pendimethalin alone. Texas millet and southern crabgrass were the predominant weeds present all years. Pendimethalin alone did not effectively control Texas millet regardless of time of application, whereas southern crabgrass was controlled by pendimethalin alone PRE. Delayed applications of pendimethalin controlled Texas millet and southern crabgrass when combined with either paraquat or imazapic, with imazapic being the preferred combination due to effectiveness at most all delayed applications. Peanut yields were improved when any of the herbicide combinations were applied PRE compared to later applications. Across all times of application, pendimethalin plus imazapic effectively protected peanut yields from annual grass interference.

Technical Abstract: In strip-tillage systems, situations occasionally arise where dinitroaniline herbicides are not applied in a timely manner to peanut. In these cases, dinitroaniline herbicides would be applied days or weeks after seeding. However, there is no information that documents the effects of delayed applications on weed control. Trials were initiated in 2004 in Tifton, GA to determine the weed control efficacy of delayed applications of pendimethalin in strip-tillage peanut production. Treatments were a factorial arrangement of seven possible times of pendimethalin application and three possible tank-mixtures with pendimethalin. Times of pendimethalin application were preemergence (PRE) immediately after seeding, vegetative emergence (VE) of peanut, 1-wk after VE (VE+1wk), VE+2wk, VE+3wk, VE+4wk, and a control not treated with pendimethalin. Herbicide combinations evaluated were paraquat plus pendimethalin, imazapic plus pendimethalin, and pendimethalin alone. Texas millet and southern crabgrass were the predominant weeds present all years. Pendimethalin alone did not effectively control Texas millet regardless of time of application, whereas southern crabgrass was controlled by pendimethalin alone PRE. Delayed applications of pendimethalin controlled Texas millet and southern crabgrass when combined with either paraquat or imazapic, with imazapic being the preferred combination due to effectiveness at most all delayed applications. Peanut yields were improved when any of the herbicide combinations were applied PRE compared to later applications. Across all times of application, pendimethalin plus imazapic effectively protected peanut yields from annual grass interference.

Last Modified: 10/1/2014
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