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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: UMBRELLA PROJECT FOR FOOD SAFETY

Location: Warmwater Aquaculture Research Unit

Title: The Effect of Pasteurization Temperature on Consumer Acceptability, Sensory Characteristics, Volatile Compound Composition, and Shelf-Life of Fluid Milk

Authors
item Gandy, A - MISS. STATE UNIVERSITY
item Schilling, M - MISS. STATE UNIVERSITY
item Coggins, P - MISS. STATE UNIVERSITY
item White, C - MISS. STATE UNIVERSITY
item Yoon, Y - MISS. STATE UNIVERSITY
item Kamadia, V - MISS. STATE UNIVERSITY

Submitted to: Journal of Dairy Science
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: January 7, 2008
Publication Date: May 1, 2008
Citation: Gandy, A.E., Schilling, M.W., Coggins, P.C., White, C.W., Yoon, Y., Kamadia, V.V. 2008. The Effect of Pasteurization Temperature on Consumer Acceptability, Sensory Characteristics, Volatile Compound Composition, and Shelf-Life of Fluid Milk. Journal of Dairy Science. 91:1769-1777.

Interpretive Summary: The temperature used to pasteurize milk can impact its sensory attributes, consumer acceptability, and shelf-life. We determined the effects of pasteurizing 2% milk at temperatures of 77, 79, 82, and 85°C on subsequent sensory attributes, consumer acceptability, volatile compound composition, and shelf-life during storage. Consumers preferred milk pasteurized at 79°C over other treatments on day 0; at day 6 postpasteurization, milk pasteurized at 79 and 82°C was preferred over the 77°C treatment. Overall, consumers showed a preference for milk pasteurized at 79°C. Pasteurization temperature did not affect shelf-life or sensory descriptors and volatile compound composition at the end of shelf-life. This research reveals that altering the pasteurization temperature from 79°C may cause a decrease in consumer acceptability.

Technical Abstract: The relationship among consumer acceptability, descriptive sensory attributes, and shelf-life was determined for 2% milk pasteurized at 77, 79, 82, and 85°C. Sensory descriptive attributes and volatile compound composition were monitored over the shelf-life of the products to determine if treatments could be differentiated at various times through out the shelf-life of the product. Consumers preferred 79°C milk over other treatments on d 0; however, at d 6 postpasteurization, 79 and 82°C milks were preferred over the 77°C treatment. Consumers were grouped into 8 clusters based on product liking for both d 0 and d 6 evaluations. The largest cluster liked all pasteurization treatments, and 79°C milk was highly acceptable to all consumers who liked milk. Similar sensory descriptors indicated the end of shelf-life for all pasteurization treatments even though treatments could be differentiated by descriptors on d 0. This research reveals that altering the pasteurization temperature from 79°C may cause a decrease in consumer acceptability to some consumers. Also, altering pasteurization temperature did not affect shelf-life or sensory descriptors and volatile compound composition at the end of shelf-life.

Last Modified: 9/10/2014
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