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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: IPM TECHNOLOGIES FOR SUBTROPICAL INSECT PESTS

Location: Subtropical Insects and Horticulture Research

Title: The roles of olfactory cues, visual cues, and mating status in orientation of Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Psyllidae) to four different host plants

Authors
item Wenninger, Erik
item Stelinski, Lukasz - UNIV OF FLORIDA
item Hall, David

Submitted to: Environmental Entomology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: November 3, 2008
Publication Date: January 1, 2009
Citation: Wenninger, E., Stelinski, L.L., Hall, D.G. 2009. The roles of olfactory cues, visual cues, and mating status in orientation of Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Psyllidae) to four different host plants. Environmental Entomology. 38:225-234.

Interpretive Summary: We examined behavioral responses to host plant odors and green or yellow visual cues in the Asian citrus psyllid. Responses varied by psyllid sex and mating status and among the four host plants tested. Generally, evidence of attraction was stronger in females and in mated individuals of both sexes relative to virgins. The presence of a visual cue typically enhanced attractiveness of host plant odors. In the absence of visual cues, attraction was exhibited by females and males only to odors from sour orange and navel orange, respectively. We also confirmed electrophysiological responses of the antennae to citrus volatiles. The results reported here suggest that the Asian citrus psyllid uses olfactory and visual cues in orientation to host plants, and suggest the possibility of using plant volatiles in monitoring and management of this worldwide pest of citrus.

Technical Abstract: Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Psyllidae) is an important worldwide pest of citrus that vectors three phloem-restricted bacteria in the genus Candidatus Liberibacter, the causative agents of huanglongbing (citrus greening disease). We examined the behavioral responses of mated and unmated D. citri of both sexes to odors from host plants in a Y-tube olfactometer, with and without visual cues. The host plants tested were: Duncan grapefruit [Citrus paradisi Macfayden], sour orange [Citrus aurantium L.], navel orange [C. sinensis (L.)], and Murraya paniculata (L.) Jack. Responses varied by plant species and by psyllid sex and mating status. Generally, evidence of attraction was stronger in females and in mated individuals of both sexes relative to virgins. The presence of a visual cue typically enhanced attractiveness of olfactory cues; in no case did unmated individuals show evidence of attraction to host plant odors in the absence of a visual cue. In the absence of visual cues, attraction was exhibited by females and males only to odors from sour orange and navel orange, respectively. Psyllids exhibited weaker anemotactic responses when visual cues were presented without plant odors, suggesting that olfactory cues might facilitate long-distance orientation, with visual cues operating at smaller spatial scales. Antennal responses to citrus volatiles were confirmed by electroantennogram. The results reported here suggest that D. citri uses olfactory and visual cues in orientation to host plants, and suggest the possibility of using plant volatiles in monitoring and management of this pest.

Last Modified: 4/23/2014
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