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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: IMPROVING THE PRODUCTION EFFICIENCY AND SUSTAINABILITY OF MORONE SPECIES CULTURE

Location: Harry K. Dupree Stuttgart National Aquaculture Research Center

Title: Development and testing of a pedigree marking system using visible implant elastomer tags for selective improvement in Morone breeding programmes

Authors
item Fuller, Adam
item McEntire, Matthew
item Ludwig, Gerald

Submitted to: Aquaculture Research
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: September 15, 2009
Publication Date: July 1, 2010
Citation: Fuller, S.A., McEntire, M.E., Ludwig, G.M. 2010. Development and testing of a pedigree marking system using visible implant elastomer tags for selective improvement in Morone breeding programmes. Aquaculture Research. 41:1250-1254.

Interpretive Summary: We developed and tested a visible marking system for identifying family groups of sunshine bass, using six body locations, and white bass, using two body locations and four unique fluorescent colors. White bass fingerlings were raised for 105 days in a growth trial. Tag visibility decreased throughout the trial as the fish grew bigger. The ability to see the tags varied depending on where the tag was placed. This marking system successfully identified which family the best growing white bass belonged to.

Technical Abstract: The development and testing of a visible implant elastomer (VIE) pedigree marking system was evaluated in sunshine bass, Morone chrysops X M. saxatilis, and white bass, Morone chrysops (Rafinesque). VIE tags were tested in sunshine bass fingerlings at one of six body locations (posterior to left or right eye, left or right dorsal, caudal, or anal). White bass fingerlings representing eight genetic groups were then tagged at one of two body locations (left or right dorsal) using one of four fluorescent colors and reared for 105 days in a common garden growth trial. Tag visibility decreased with increased sunshine bass growth (63 percent at 56 days after tagging). Visibility differed among body locations, with caudal and anal having lower visibility. Tag visibility in white bass was 99.5 percent at 14 days, 98.2 percent at 28 days, and 94.9 percent at 56 days post-tag. Testing of the pedigree tagging system successfully identified superior growing white bass fingerlings after 56 days (P = 0.03) (range 5.24 – 7.33 g).

Last Modified: 9/23/2014
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