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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: GENOMIC AND IMMUNOLOGIC STRATEGIES TO IMPROVE MILK PRODUCTION EFFICIENCY AND CONTROL MASTITIS Title: Pathogen-dependent induction of cytokines and other soluble inflammatory mediators during intramammary infection of dairy cows

Author
item Bannerman, Douglas

Submitted to: Journal of Animal Science
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: August 5, 2008
Publication Date: August 15, 2008
Citation: Bannerman, D.D. 2008. Pathogen-dependent induction of cytokines and other soluble inflammatory mediators during intramammary infection of dairy cows. Journal of Animal Science. 87:10-25.

Interpretive Summary: Mastitis remains among the most costly and prevalent diseases in the dairy industry. The ability of bacteria to establish infection is determined, in part, by the nature and rapidity of the corresponding host innate immune response. Over the past decade, there has been a marked increase in the understanding of the upregulation of cytokines and other soluble mediators of inflammation during the course of intramammary infection. The objectives of this manuscript are to summarize the current understanding of the cytokine response to intramammary infection, highlight recent findings identifying differences in the cytokine response to various bacterial pathogens, and discuss future research directions that will increase our knowledge of the role of inflammatory mediators in predicting and governing the outcome of mastitis. The results summarized in this manuscript are important to the dairy industry and veterinarians as it establishes an application for cytokines and other soluble mediators of inflammation as biomarkers of intramammary infection. These findings form the basis for future studies investigating the utility of these proteins as indicators of disease severity and the guidance of therapeutic decisions.

Technical Abstract: Mastitis is a highly prevalent and costly disease of dairy cows that is commonly caused by intramammary bacterial infection. The innate immune response to bacterial penetration of the mammary gland is evoked within hours of infection and the rapidity and magnitude of this response have been demonstrated to influence the resolution of this disease. Cytokines and other mediators of inflammation are known to play critical roles in the innate immune response to intramammary infection. The objectives of this review are to summarize the current understanding of the cytokine response to intramammary infection, highlight recent findings identifying differences in the cytokine response to various bacterial pathogens, and discuss future research directions that will increase our knowledge of the role of inflammatory mediators in predicting and governing the outcome of mastitis.

Last Modified: 9/21/2014
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