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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: DEVELOP AND IMPROVE STRATEGIES FOR MANAGEMENT OF IRRIGATED AGRICULTURAL CROPS AND SOILS

Location: Northwest Irrigation and Soils Research

Title: Soil Genesis and Development, Lesson 4 - Soil Profile Development

Authors
item Reuter, R - OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY
item Mamo, M - UNIVERSITY OF NEBRASKA
item Kettler, T - UNIVERSITY OF NEBRASKA
item Ippolito, James
item Mccallister, D - UNIVERSITY OF NEBRASKA
item Zanner, W - UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA
item Geiss, C - TRINITY COLLEGE
item Morner, P - UNIVERSITY OF NEBRASKA
item Soester, J - UNIVERSITY OF NEBRASKA

Submitted to: Journal of Natural Resources and Life Sciences Education
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: September 4, 2009
Publication Date: October 15, 2009
Citation: Reuter, R., Mamo, M., Kettler, T., Ippolito, J.A., Mccallister, D., Zanner, W., Geiss, C., Morner, P., Soester, J. 2009. Soil Genesis and Development, Lesson 4 - Soil Profile Development. Journal of Natural Resources and Life Sciences Education. 38:239.

Interpretive Summary: This on-line lesson, developed by Reuter et al. (http://plantandsoil.unl.edu/croptechnology2005/soil_sci/?what=informationModuleList&subjectCategoryId=1117662050) introduces the user as to how the processes of addition, loss, transformation, and translocation drive soil formation and how these processes relate to the characteristics of a soil profile. The lesson is written to target lower-level undergraduate student educational needs and is available for use by the general public.

Technical Abstract: The history of a soil is reflected in the arrangement of its constituent parts. Largely the arrangement is related to the movement, or lack of movement, of water through the soil in all directions. Understanding the processes that result in a specific soil type allows for more precise and effective management for all types of land use, from residential development to precision agricultural practices. The overarching goal of this lesson is to understand how the processes of addition, loss, transformation, and translocation drive soil formation and relate these processes to the characteristics of a soil profile. These processes can then be extrapolated to assess impacts of management or natural events on the soil resource. The lesson is written to target educational needs of lower-level undergraduate students and is open for use by the public and educational institutions. Depending on the goals and objectives of a course, training, or workshop, part or all sections of the lesson could be used. Website available at: http://plantandsoil.unl.edu/croptechnology2005/soil_sci/?what=informationModuleList&subjectCategoryId=1117662050

Last Modified: 4/20/2014
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