Page Banner

United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: The Increased Availability and Marketing of Fruit, Juice, and Vegetables to Middle School Students Increases Consumption

Authors
item Thompson, Victoria - UT MD ANDERSON CANCR CTR
item Cullen, Karen
item Watson, Kathy - BAYLOR COLLEGE MED
item Zakeri, Issa

Submitted to: Journal of Child Nutrition and Management
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: January 1, 2007
Publication Date: April 1, 2007
Citation: Thompson, V., Cullen, K.W., Watson, K.B., Zakeri, I. 2007. The increased availability and marketing of fruit, juice, and vegetables to middle school students increases consumption. Journal of Child Nutrition and Management [serial online]. 31(1). Available: http://docs.schoolnutrition.org/newsroom/jcnm/07spring/thompson/index.asp.

Interpretive Summary: This study looked at whether middle school students would eat more fruit, juice, and vegetables (FJV) during school lunch if more FJV were available in the school snack bar/a la carte line, and if these items were advertised in the cafeteria. Fifteen schools participated in this study and were randomized into Intervention A schools (advertising and increased availability of FJV in both semesters), Intervention B schools (only increased availability FJV in the first semester; advertising added in the second semester), and schools that did not change anything. Observations took place each week to check whether the FJV were available, and students recorded what they ate at lunch. Students in availability and advertising schools ate more fruit and juice and fried vegetables than students in the other schools. Advertising that promotes fruit and juice appears to increase consumption of these items during school lunch.

Technical Abstract: The objectives of this intervention were to determine whether middle school student consumption of fruit, juice, and vegetables (FJV) during school lunch would be increased by: 1) increasing FJV availability and accessibility in the middle school school lunch snack bar/a la carte line; and 2) combining increased FJV availability and accessibility with a social marketing campaign. The 15 schools participating in this study were randomized into Intervention A schools (social marketing and increased availability/accessibility of FJV in both semesters), Intervention B schools (only increased availability/accessibility of FJV in the first semester; social marketing added to increased FJV in the second semester), and Control schools. Process observations (observations of intervention compliance) and student food consumption at lunch were recorded. Consumption was analyzed for each intervention group and semester using ANOVA. Post-hoc analyses identified specific differences. Students in availability and marketing schools consumed more fruit and juice (FJ) and fried vegetables than students in availability only and Control schools. Social marketing increased FJ consumption in students. Adding a social marketing campaign that promotes FJ can increase consumption of FJ during school lunch.

Last Modified: 8/29/2014
Footer Content Back to Top of Page