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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: RANGELAND RESTORATION AND MANAGEMENT Title: Monitoring Grazing Lands

Authors
item Johnson, D - OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY
item Davies, Kirk

Submitted to: Cow Calf Management Guide and Cattle Producer's Library
Publication Type: Book / Chapter
Publication Acceptance Date: September 30, 2008
Publication Date: April 1, 2009
Citation: Johnson, D.D., Davies, K.W. 2009. MONITORING GRAZING LANDS. Cow Calf Management Guide and Cattle Producer's Library. CL518:518-1 - 518-7.

Interpretive Summary: An important step in developing a ranch or allotment management plan for grazing lands is defining a rangeland monitoring program to evaluate progress toward achieving management objectives. A monitoring program can: 1) help determine the benefits gained from changes in grazing management or investments in range improvements, 2) facilitate a better understanding of rangeland plants and how they interact with each other, the environment and grazing animals, 3) build confidence in the management strategy, and 4) provide stories of success and failure (as the case may be) that can be shared with others as learning opportunities. Perhaps most importantly, monitoring allows managers to practice adaptive management. A monitoring program is a multi-step process that includes more than just the collection of data and information on grazing lands; it also involves analysis and interpretation of monitoring results in relation to management objectives and inputs to support short-term and long-term management decision-making. In this paper, we explain how to develop a monitoring program to meet the needs of land managers.

Technical Abstract: An important step in developing a ranch or allotment management plan for grazing lands is defining a rangeland monitoring program to evaluate progress toward achieving management objectives. A monitoring program can: 1) help determine the benefits gained from changes in grazing management or investments in range improvements, 2) facilitate a better understanding of rangeland plants and how they interact with each other, the environment and grazing animals, 3) build confidence in the management strategy, and 4) provide stories of success and failure (as the case may be) that can be shared with others as learning opportunities. Perhaps most importantly, monitoring allows managers to practice adaptive management. A monitoring program is a multi-step process that includes more than just the collection of data and information on grazing lands; it also involves analysis and interpretation of monitoring results in relation to management objectives and inputs to support short-term and long-term management decision-making. In this paper, we explain how to develop a monitoring program to meet the needs of land managers.

Last Modified: 11/22/2014
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