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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: POTATO GERMPLASM ENHANCEMENT THROUGH TRAIT DISCOVERY, GENETIC EVALUATION AND INCORPORATION

Location: Vegetable and Forage Crops Production Research

Title: Detection of tobacco rattle virus RNA in processed potato chips displaying symptoms of corky ringspot disease

Author
item Crosslin, James

Submitted to: HortScience
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: July 7, 2009
Publication Date: October 1, 2009
Citation: Crosslin, J. 2009. Detection of tobacco rattle virus RNA in processed potato chips displaying symptoms of corky ringspot disease. HortScience. 44:1790-1791.

Interpretive Summary: Tobacco rattle virus (TRV) is transmitted by soil-inhabiting nematodes and causes corky ringspot disease (CRS) in potatoes. The symptoms in the potatoes are dark rings, arcs, blotches, or areas of corky tissue, hence the name of the disease. Symptoms similar to those of CRS were observed in processed potato chips from three different bags purchased at three locations. Molecular tests (RT-PCR) confirmed the presence of the genomic material (RNA) of TRV in these chips. It is believed that this is the first report of the detection of plant virus RNA in a processed food product.

Technical Abstract: A portion of genomic RNA 1 of tobacco rattle tobravirus (TRV) was amplified by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction from each of eight processed potato chips from three different bags purchased at three locations. The positive chips all had symptoms typical of corky ringspot disease, caused by TRV infection, and consisted of dark brown arcs and rings. Sequence analysis of the 463 bp amplicons confirmed that the products were indeed TRV in origin and were 97% identical to TRV sequences of isolates originating in Washington, Florida, and Wisconsin. Chip extracts were not infectious when mechanically inoculated onto tobacco leaves. To the authors’ knowledge this is the first report of the detection of plant virus genomic RNA in a processed food product.

Last Modified: 4/20/2014
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