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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Bait formulations and longevity of navel orangeworm egg traps tested

Authors
item Kuenen, Lodewyk
item Bentley, Walt - UNIV OF CALIFORNIA
item Rowe, Heather - UNIV OF CALIFORNIA
item Ribeiro, Brian - UNIV OF CALIFORNIA

Submitted to: California Agriculture
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: November 8, 2007
Publication Date: March 31, 2008
Citation: Kuenen, L.P., Bentley, W., Rowe, H., Ribeiro, B. 2008. Bait formulations and longevity of navel orangeworm egg traps tested. California Agriculture. 62(1):36-39.

Interpretive Summary: Standardization of pest monitoring practices and materials to maximize sensitivity to pest populations in the field is a foundation of effective integrated pest management (IPM). Due to changes in the availability of commercial bait material for navel orangeworm (NOW) egg traps, we evaluated potential alternative bait materials for use in monitoring this key pest of almonds, pistachios, walnuts and figs. Three seasons of field tests showed that egg traps baited with almond meal plus 3% or 10% crude almond oil received similar numbers of navel orangeworm eggs, and these traps were equally effective for at least 10 weeks, a long time for a field bait.

Technical Abstract: Standardization of pest monitoring practices and materials to maximize sensitivity to pest populations in the field is a foundation of effective integrated pest management (IPM). Due to changes in the availability of commercial bait material for navel orangeworm (NOW) egg traps, we evaluated potential alternative bait materials for use in monitoring this key pest of almonds, pistachios, walnuts and figs. Almond meal plus 10% crude almond oil was superior to nuts infested with NOW larvae, a non-standardizable bait used by many pest control advisors. Three seasons of field tests showed that egg traps baited with almond meal plus 3% or 10% crude almond oil received similar numbers of navel orangeworm eggs, and these traps were equally effective for at least 10 weeks, a long time for a field bait.

Last Modified: 8/30/2014
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