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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: SURVEILLANCE AND ECOLOGY OF MOSQUITO, BITING AND FILTH BREEDING INSECTS Title: Discovery of diurnal resting sites of phlebotomine sand flies in a village in southern Egypt.

Authors
item Hogsette, Jerome
item Hanafi, Hanafi - U. S. NAVY MEDICAL UNIT
item Bernier, Ulrich
item Kline, Daniel
item Fawaz, Emad - U. S. NAVY MEDICAL UNIT
item Furman, Barry - U. S. NAVY MEDICAL UNIT
item Hoel, David - NAVY/MARINE PUBLIC HEALTH

Submitted to: Journal of the American Mosquito Control Association
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: September 18, 2008
Publication Date: December 31, 2008
Citation: Hogsette, J.A., Hanafi, H.A., Bernier, U.R., Kline, D.L., Fawaz, E.Y., Furman, B.D., Hoel, D.F. 2008. Discovery of dirunal resting sites of phlebotomine sand flies in a village in southern Egypt. Journal of the American Mosquito Control Association. 24(4):601-603.

Interpretive Summary: Phlebotomine sand flies are serious pests of humans in the Middle East and can transmit diseases such as Leishmaniasis. It is thought that daytime resting sites are close to their nighttime hosts. Discovery of daytime resting sites could improve control programs. Sand fly adults were aspirated from low (30-45 cm high) piles of mud bricks found under high date palm canopies between the village and the Nile River. Six of the females were engorged with blood. A total of 78 sand flies were captured on 3 glue boards left on the ground at the site overnight.

Technical Abstract: Phlebotomine sand flies are serious pests of humans in Egypt and other parts of the Middle East. These flies are persistent biters and can transmit diseases such as Leishmaniasis. Because they are considered to be weak fliers, it is suspected that daytime resting sites are close to their nighttime hosts. Discovery and characterization of daytime resting sites could provide an additional parameter for control programs. Scientists from the USDA-CMAVE worked cooperatively with NAVY scientists from NAMRU-3 in Cairo to search for daytime resting sites Aswan, Egypt. Using a backpack aspirator, scientists collected 12 Phlebotomus papatasi and 3 Sergentomyia schwetzi adults from low piles of mud bricks. A total of 78 sand flies were captured on 3 glue boards left on the ground at the site overnight.

Last Modified: 10/30/2014
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