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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: ANTIOXIDANT MODULATION OF ATHEROSCLEROSIS AND ANGIOGENESIS

Location: Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging

Title: In vitro fatty acid enrichment of macrophages alters inflammatory response and net cholesterol accumulation

Authors
item Wang, Shu - HNRCA AT TUFTS UNIVERSITY
item Wu, Dayong - HNRCA AT TUFTS UNIVERSITY
item Lamon-Fava, Stefania - HNRCA AT TUFTS UNIVERSITY
item Matthan, Nirupa - HNRCA AT TUFTS UNIVERSITY
item Honda, Kaori - HNRCA AT TUFTS UNIVERSITY
item Lichtenstein, Alice

Submitted to: British Journal of Nutrition
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: January 5, 2009
Publication Date: August 4, 2009
Citation: Wang, S., Wu, D., Lamon-Fava, S., Matthan, N.R., Honda, K.L., Lichtenstein, A.H. 2009. In vitro fatty acid enrichment of macrophages alters inflammatory response and net cholesterol accumulation. British Journal of Nutrition. 102:497-501.

Interpretive Summary: The fatty acids that come from fish, frequently referred to as the very long chain omega (omega)-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), compared to omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids, are thought to have unique benefits with respect to heart disease. We used cell culture techniques to study this issue further. Macrophages (M phi) differentiated from human monocytic cell line THP-1 were exposed to omega-3 PUFA (eicosapentaenoic acid [EPA], docosahexaenoic acid [DHA]) and omega-6 PUFA (linoleic acid [LA], arachidonic acid [AA]), relative to saturated fatty acids (SFA), (myristic acid [MA], palmitic acid PA]) to determine inflammatory factors response, minimally modified-LDL (MM-LDL)-induced cholesterol accumulation, and mRNA levels of genes involved in inflammation and cholesterol accumulation. Compared with the saturated fatty acids (MA and PA), M phi exposed to PUFA, especially EPA and AA, had lower inflammatory response (tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin-6 and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1) as indicated by lower mRNA levels and secretion of the protein. A reduction in mRNA levels of cholesterol transport markers, M phi scavenger receptor 1, ATP-binding cassette A1, and scavenger receptor B class 1, was also found. From these data we can conclude that PUFA had an inhibitory effect on LPS-stimulated inflammatory response in M phi when compared to SFA and these effects were not related to the omega position of the first double bond or chain length.

Technical Abstract: Dietary omega (omega)-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) and omega–6 PUFA are thought to have unique benefits with respect to cardiovascular disease. Macrophages (M phi) differentiated from human monocytic cell line THP-1 were used to assess the effect of omega-3 PUFA (eicosapentaenoic acid [EPA], docosahexaenoic acid [DHA]) and omega-6 PUFA (linoleic acid [LA], arachidonic acid [AA]), relative to saturated fatty acids (SFA), (myristic acid [MA], palmitic acid PA]), on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated release of inflammatory factors, minimally modified-LDL (MM-LDL)-induced cholesterol accumulation, and mRNA levels of genes involved in inflammation and cholesterol accumulation. Compared with MA and PA, M phi exposed to PUFA, especially EPA and AA, had lower inflammatory response as indicated by lower mRNA levels and secretion of tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin-6 and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1. A reduction in mRNA levels of cholesterol transport markers, M phi scavenger receptor 1, ATP-binding cassette A1, and scavenger receptor B class 1, was also found. These data suggest PUFA had an inhibitory effect on LPS-stimulated inflammatory response in M phi when compared to SFA, with AA and EPA having a more pronounced effect than LA and DHA. These effects were not related to the omega position of the first double bond or chain length.

Last Modified: 7/28/2014
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