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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: IMPROVED PLANT GENETIC RESOURCES FOR PASTURES AND RANGELANDS IN THE TEMPERATE SEMIARID REGIONS OF THE WESTERN U.S.

Location: Forage and Range Research

Title: Collection and Domestication of Rangeland Plant Species with Emphasis on Mongolia and China

Authors
item JOHNSON, DOUGLAS
item Jigjidsuren, Sodnomdarjaa - ULAANBAATAR, MONGOLIA
item Gu, Anlin - HUHHOT, CHINA

Submitted to: International Grasslands Congress
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: April 8, 2008
Publication Date: June 6, 2008
Citation: Johnson, D.A., Jigjidsuren, S., Gu, A. 2008. Collection and Domestication of Rangeland Plant Species with Emphasis on Mongolia and China. International Grasslands Congress.

Interpretive Summary: Changing economic and social conditions are threatening plant diversity on rangelands in Mongolia and Inner Mongolia, China. Consequently, scientists from the U.S.A., Mongolia, and China collected seed of important rangeland plants in Mongolia and Inner Mongolia to preserve these plants for future use. The U.S.A. portion of the seed was incorporated into the U.S. National Plant Germplasm System where it is freely available to scientists around the world. Subsequent field studies in Mongolia evaluated the collections for establishment, forage production, and various agronomic characteristics. An ongoing project in Mongolia is increasing seed of the most promising collections for revegetation of abandoned croplands, restoration of deteriorated areas around villages, and rehabilitation of areas disturbed by mining. These and other studies being conducted in the U.S.A. will assist in the use of these plant species for livestock production, revegetation, conservation, and reduced-input turf.

Technical Abstract: Changing economic and social conditions are threatening plant diversity on rangelands in Mongolia and China. Teams of collaborating scientists from the U.S.A., Mongolia, and China collected seed of rangeland plant species in Mongolia and Inner Mongolia, China, to preserve plant biodiversity from these countries. The U.S.A. portion of the seed was incorporated into the U.S. National Plant Germplasm System where it is freely available to scientists around the world. Subsequent field evaluations in Mongolia identified the most promising collections for revegetation of abandoned croplands, restoration of deteriorated areas around villages, and rehabilitation of areas disturbed by mining. An ongoing project in Mongolia is increasing seed of the most promising collections. These studies will assist in the use of these species for livestock production, revegetation, conservation, and reduced-input turf in Mongolia, China, the western U.S.A., and other countries around the world.

Last Modified: 8/19/2014
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