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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: SUSTAINABLE SYSTEMS FOR INTEGRATED PEST MANAGEMENT AND CONSERVATION AND ENHANCEMENT OF NATURAL ENEMIES Title: Spatiotemporal patterns and dispersal of stink bugs (Heteroptera: Pentatomidae) in peanut-cotton farmscapes

Authors
item Tillman, Patricia
item Northfield, Tobin - WASHINGTON STATE UNIV
item Mizell, Russ - UNIV OF FL
item Riddle, T - UNIV OF FL

Submitted to: Environmental Entomology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: June 1, 2009
Publication Date: August 1, 2009
Repository URL: http://www.bioone.org/doi/pdf/10.1603/022.038.0411
Citation: Tillman, P.G., Northfield, T.D., Mizell, R.F., Riddle, T.C. 2009. Spatiotemporal patterns and dispersal of stink bugs (Heteroptera: Pentatomidae) in peanut-cotton farmscapes. Environmental Entomology. 38(4):1038-1052.

Interpretive Summary: In cotton, stink bugs are primary pests responsible for millions of dollars in losses and cost of control. Generally, peanuts are grown in rotation with cotton in peanut-cotton farmscapes. The objective of this 4-yr on-farm study was to examine the spatial and temporal patterns and dispersal of the southern green stink bug and the brown stink bug in these farmscapes. We used GIS (Geographical Information Systems) mapping, a new spatial analysis technique, and graphs of stink bug development over certain periods of time to examine spatial distribution and abundance of these pests in these farmscapes. Altogether, the analyses for each of the peanut-cotton farmscapes strongly indicated that southern green stink bugs and brown stink bugs moved from peanuts into cotton at the interface, or common boundary, of peanut-cotton farmscapes. A new spatial analysis technique revealed that these stink bugs aggregated in cotton as they fed on cotton bolls at the interface of the farmscapes and both species generally occurred together in this part of the cotton field. In the last year of the project, we proved that southern green stink bugs and brown stink bugs in peanuts actually do move from peanuts into cotton at the interface of the farmscape. Understanding the spatial and temporal patterns of stink bugs in peanut-cotton farmscapes will help in developing management strategies for these stink bugs in cotton.

Technical Abstract: The objective of this 4-yr on-farm study was to examine the spatiotemporal patterns and dispersal of the southern green stink bug, Nezara viridula (L.), and the brown stink bug, Euschistus servus (Say), in peanuts, Arachis hypogaea L., and cotton, Gossypium hirsutum L., in peanut-cotton farmscapes. Abundance of nymphs and adults of E. servus and N. viridula in both cotton and peanuts was determined over time for each of the six peanut-cotton farmscapes studied. GIS (Geographical Information Systems) maps were constructed to visualize the spatial patterns of these insects in each farmscape. SADIE (Spatial Analysis by Distance Indices) methodology was used to examine spatial pattern and association in peanuts and cotton for each farmscape. Altogether, the spatiotemporal analyses for each of the peanut-cotton farmscapes strongly indicated that E. servus and N. viridula adults dispersed from peanuts into cotton at the interface, or common boundary, of a peanut-cotton farmscape. SADIE analyses revealed that these stink bugs aggregated in cotton as they fed on cotton bolls at the interface of the farmscapes and both species generally occurred together in this part of the cotton field. In the last year of the project, mark-recapture studies demonstrated that N. viridula and E. servus nymphs and adults in peanuts dispersed into cotton at the interface of the farmscape, and most (62.75%) of the stink bugs dispersed from peanuts into row 1 of cotton. Overall, what appears to be driving the spatiotemporal distribution of N. viridula and E. servus in peanut-cotton farmscapes is food quality and availability of food in time and space.

Last Modified: 10/21/2014
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