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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: A comprehensive process evaluation of a community based participatory research intervention, Fit for Life Steps

Authors
item Powers, Alicia - UNIV SO MISSISSIPPI
item Yadrick, M. Kathy - UNIV SO MISSISSIPPI
item Connell, Carol - UNIV SO MISSISSIPPI
item Zoellner, Jamie - UNIV SO MISSISSIPPI
item Molaison, Elaine - UNIV SO MISSISSIPPI
item Williams, Amanda - UNIV SO MISSISSIPPI
item Ndirango, Murugi - GEORGIA STATE UNIV

Submitted to: International Society for Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: March 18, 2008
Publication Date: May 22, 2008
Citation: Powers, A., Yadrick, M.K., Connell, C., Zoellner, J., Molaison, E., Williams, A., Ndirango, M. 2008. A comprehensive process evaluation of a community based participatory research intervention, Fit for Life Steps [abstract]. Proceedings of the International Society for Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, May 21-24, 2008, Banff, Alberta, Canada. p. 154.

Technical Abstract: The purpose of this study was to conduct a comprehensive process evaluation of Fit for Life Steps (FFLS), a community based participatory research (CBPR) influenced intervention focused on improving physical activity and health in residents of the Lower Mississippi Delta. A comprehensive framework for conducting process evaluations in public health programs guided this typical descriptive study of ten essential process evaluation components. The sample included community-nominated walking group coaches, coach-recruited walking group members, certified data collectors, and intervention staff. Numerous data collection forms were utilized, such as intervention activity tracking forms, contact logs, and walking logs. Also, focus groups and structured interviews were completed. Multiple data analysis techniques were conducted: content analysis, descriptive statistical analysis, focus group and structured interview theme identification and triangulation. A moderate level of fidelity, reach, implementation, and exposure for the entire intervention and a majority of intervention components was noted. In addition, an overwhelmingly positive reaction to the entire intervention and most intervention components was found. Recruitment in FFLS limited diversity of participants. However, those recruited maintained a high level of participation. Some barriers and contextual issues present during FFLS may have negatively influenced implementation of FFLS. However, contamination issues positively influenced participation and maintenance. This is the first study to provide a comprehensive process evaluation of all essential process evaluation components for a CBPR-influenced public health intervention. Therefore, this study not only informs the present and future CBPR interventions but also process evaluation procedures for public health programs.

Last Modified: 8/30/2014
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