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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Physiological Aspects of Seed Development in a Hawaiian Palm

Authors
item Pérez, H - UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
item Hill, Lisa
item Criley, R - UNIVERSITY OF HAWAII
item Baskin, C - UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY
item Drake, D - UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
item Kobayashi, K - UNIVERSITY OF HAWAII
item Maunder, M - FAIRCHILD TROPICAL BOTANI
item Walters, Christina

Submitted to: Meeting Abstract
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: July 6, 2008
Publication Date: July 6, 2008
Citation: Perez, H., Hill, L.M., Criley, R., Baskin, C., Drake, D., Kobayashi, K., Maunder, M., Walters, C.T. 2008. Physiological aspects of seed development in a hawaiian palm. 9th International Conference on Seed Biology. July 6-11, 2008. Olsztyn, Poland. pp. 135. Meeting Abstract.

Interpretive Summary: The genetic diversity of palms (Arecaceae) is threatened and ex situ conservation efforts are hampered by a poor understanding of their seed biology and storage behavior. Pritchardia remota is fan palm endemic to Hawaii (subtribe Corypheae). Flowering of P. remota occurs mostly during the dry season and fruits mature about 400 days post-anthesis (PA) (also during the dry season). Dry mass of the fruit and seed increases about 10 fold and embryo mass increases 100 fold during the first 250 days PA to achieve maximum mass of about 2.0g, 1.6g, and 5.5mg, respectively. Soluble carbohydrates are a major food reserve, comprising 35-45% of the dry mass of the embryo. About 7% of the endosperm is comprised of lipids, which contain a high level of saturated fatty acids. Excised embryos acquire the ability to germinate and survive partial drying (to 75% RH) 100 and 250 days PA, respectively. The water potential of embryos is close to 0 MPa during dry matter accumulation (DMA), but a decrease to –1.5 MPa is coincident with maximum DMA (250 days PA). A further decrease to -35 MPa occurs at about 370 days PA, with a final decrease to about -60 MPa upon shedding (400 days PA). Between 250 and 400 days PA, the embryo is remarkably latent, showing low respiration, reduced germination rate when excised, and high survival when placed at intermediate water potentials. Long term preservation of P. remota seeds is possible if water contents are optimized.

Technical Abstract: The genetic diversity of palms (Arecaceae) is threatened and ex situ conservation efforts are hampered by a poor understanding of their seed biology and storage behavior. Pritchardia remota is fan palm endemic to Hawaii (subtribe Corypheae). Flowering of P. remota occurs mostly during the dry season and fruits mature about 400 days post-anthesis (PA) (also during the dry season). Dry mass of the fruit and seed increases about 10 fold and embryo mass increases 100 fold during the first 250 days PA to achieve maximum mass of about 2.0g, 1.6g, and 5.5mg, respectively. Soluble carbohydrates are a major food reserve, comprising 35-45% of the dry mass of the embryo. About 7% of the endosperm is comprised of lipids, which contain a high level of saturated fatty acids. Excised embryos acquire the ability to germinate and survive partial drying (to 75% RH) 100 and 250 days PA, respectively. The water potential of embryos is close to 0 MPa during dry matter accumulation (DMA), but a decrease to –1.5 MPa is coincident with maximum DMA (250 days PA). A further decrease to -35 MPa occurs at about 370 days PA, with a final decrease to about -60 MPa upon shedding (400 days PA). Between 250 and 400 days PA, the embryo is remarkably latent, showing low respiration, reduced germination rate when excised, and high survival when placed at intermediate water potentials. Long term preservation of P. remota seeds is possible if water contents are optimized.

Last Modified: 4/18/2014
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