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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Using interspecific hybrids with Helianthus tuberosus L. to transfer genes for quantitative traits into cultivated sunflower, H. annuus L.

Authors
item Hulke, Brent
item Wyse, Donald - UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA

Submitted to: Meeting Proceedings
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: March 8, 2008
Publication Date: June 1, 2008
Citation: Hulke, B.S., Wyse, D.L. 2008. Using interspecific hybrids with Helianthus tuberosus L. to transfer genes for quantitative traits into cultivated sunflower, H. annuus L. Proceedings of 17th International Sunflower Conference, June 8-12, 2008, Cordoba, Spain. p. 729-734.

Interpretive Summary: Domesticated oilseed and confectionary sunflower lacks resistance to many diseases and insect pests. This fact has led many scientists to develop techniques to move resistance genes from wild species of sunflower to domesticated sunflower. These techniques are not appropriate for moving traits that are controlled by many genes, as very few genes can be moved during a single attempt. This paper describes ongoing work towards modifying these techniques to allow more genes to be moved into domesticated sunflower more efficiently. During the trial-and-error process of modifying these techniques, we are studying the genetics of important traits, those of polygenic disease and insect resistances and perennial habit. Our interest in perennial habit stems from the value that a successful perennial sunflower variety would have in environmental protection. Perennial crops have been shown to reduce erosion, reduce nutrient runoff and leaching, and perhaps even provide predictable yield in otherwise poor growing seasons. No completely successful technique has been found at this point, but by learning from our discoveries, we have a clear path for future investigation.

Technical Abstract: Interspecific hybrids in sunflower have been used historically as sources of disease resistance. Backcrossing for several generations is required to introgress genes from hexaploid species to annual sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.). A result of this repeated backcrossing is the rapid loss of genes from the donor parent. This article describes ongoing work to improve the efficiency and efficacy of introgressing genes from the hexaploid perennial, H. tuberosus L. for quantitative traits. Of particular interest are genes which control host-plant resistance to diseases and insect pests, and perennial habit.

Last Modified: 7/28/2014
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