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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: REDUCING THE ALLERGENIC PROPERTIES OF PEANUTS Title: Using phenolic compounds to reduce the allergenic properties of peanut extracts and peanut butter slurries.

Authors
item Chung, Si-Yin
item Champagne, Elaine

Submitted to: Journal of Allergy Clinical Immunology
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: November 28, 2007
Publication Date: February 15, 2008
Citation: Chung, S., Champagne, E.T. 2008. Using phenolic compounds to reduce the allergenic properties of peanut extracts and peanut butter slurries. Journal of Allergy Clinical Immunology. 121(2):S249.

Technical Abstract: Since phenolic compounds may form insoluble complexes with proteins, we determined that their interaction with peanut allergens leads to a reduction in the allergenic properties of peanut extracts and peanut butter slurries. Phenolics, such as, caffeic acid, chlorogenic acid, and ferulic acid were each incubated with roasted peanut extracts and natural peanut butter slurries, pH 7, for 30 minutes, and then centrifuged. Precipitates isolated from treated extracts were analyzed for their solubility. Supernatants from both extracts and slurries were analyzed by SDS-PAGE and inhibition ELISA for IgE binding. Results showed that of the three phenolics, caffeic acid formed the most precipitates with peanut extracts. The isolated precipitates were insoluble in 1 M NaCl or 2 M urea. SDS-PAGE of the precipitates and supernatants showed that two peanut major allergens, (Ara h 1 and Ara h 2) were predominantly in the former and not the latter. IgE bindings of the treated extracts and slurries were significantly lower than the untreated. We concluded that of the three phenolics investigated, caffeic acid exhibited the strongest reactivity with two peanut major allergens, Ara h 1 and Ara h 2. Insoluble complexes (not soluble in urea and NaCl) were formed, and both treated peanut extracts and peanut butter slurries exhibited a significantly lower level of Ara h 1/ Ara h 2 and allergenic property than the untreated. Assuming that the insoluble complexes are not absorbed by the body, this research may find an application in the development of a peanut butter-based beverage, such as, a smoothie with reduced allergenicity.

Last Modified: 10/21/2014
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