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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: WEED BIOLOGY AND ECOLOGY, AND DEVELOPMENT OF SUSTAINABLE INTEGRATED WEED MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS FOR COTTON, SOYBEAN, CORN

Location: Crop Production Systems Research Unit

Title: Cogongrass [Imperata cylindrica (L.) Beauv.]

Authors
item Maddox, Victor - MISS STATE UNIV
item Bryson, Charles
item Byrd, JR., John - MISS STATE UNIV

Submitted to: Mississippi Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station Research Report
Publication Type: Experiment Station
Publication Acceptance Date: January 30, 2008
Publication Date: January 30, 2008
Citation: Maddox, V., Bryson, C.T., Byrd, Jr., J.D. 2008. Cogongrass [Imperata cylindrica (L.) Beauv.]. Invasive Plant Atlas of Midsouth, Mississippi Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, http://www.gri.msstate.edu/ipams/Species. php.

Interpretive Summary: Cogongrass, a non-native perennial grass, is a major threat to agriculture, forest, right-of-ways, and natural areas in the southeastern United States. Over the past decade, this invasive grass has moved north at an alarming rate and is now recorded from at least one site in 75% of the counties in Mississippi. This fact sheet provides the most current information on regulations, biology, ecology, distribution, and chemical, mechanical, and physical control methods. Unless these cogongrass populations are prevented or eradicated in currently infested areas, additional spread is inevitable.

Technical Abstract: Cogongrass is a non-native, aggressive, perennial grass that is considered the World’s seventh worst weed. Over the past decade, this invasive grass has moved north and is now recorded from at least one site in 75% of the counties in Mississippi. The most recent discoveries and results from research on cogongrass biology, ecology, distribution, and chemical, mechanical, and physical control methods are provided. To aid in effective identification of cogongrass, morphological comparisons are made with a grass [Bothriochloa saccharoides (Sw.) Rydb.] that looks similar to cogongrass. Prevention of additional of cogongrass spread is dependent on exclusion procedures, early detection, and rapid response with effective control methods.

Last Modified: 4/18/2014
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