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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Planting dates for multiple cropping of biofuel feedstock and specialty crops

Authors
item Russo, Vincent
item Bruton, Benny

Submitted to: Proceedings of Horticultural Industry Show
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: January 4, 2008
Publication Date: March 24, 2008
Citation: Russo, V.M., Bruton, B.D. 2008. Planting dates for multiple cropping of biofuel feedstock and specialty crops. In: Proceedings of the 27th Annual Horticultural Industries Show. January 4-5, 2008, Tulsa, Oklahoma. p. 226-229.

Interpretive Summary: For the period late-Sept. 2006 to late-Sept. 2007 bioethanol and biodiesel feedstock crops were planted at various times to determine planting and harvest windows. Late-fall appears to the best planting time for Canola (biodiesel) for a spring harvest. A late-winter planting of Canola did not produce acceptable yields. Sunflower (biodiesel) yields increased from the early-April through mid-June periods. Sorghum (bioethanol), harvested for stalks, planted from mid-June to mid-July produced similar yields. Sweet corn (bioethanol) yields, harvested for stalks, increased from mid-June to mid-July. Precipitation was well above normal for much of the period and likely affected yields either through interference with planting, plant development, or harvest. The biofuel feedstock crops can be established and harvested at times that will allow development of production systems involving rotations with other biofuel feedstock or specialty crops.

Technical Abstract: It is necessary to determine planting and harvesting windows in order to develop production systems for biofuel feedstock and specialty crops in rotation. The biodiesel feedstock crops Canola and Sunflower; and the bioethanol feedstock crops Sorghum and Sweet corn were established at various dates and harvest dates and yields determined. Late-fall appears to the best planting time for Canola (biodiesel) for a spring harvest. A late-winter planting of Canola did not produce acceptable yields. Sunflower (biodiesel) yields increased from the early-April through mid-June periods. Sorghum (bioethanol), harvested for stalks, planted from mid-June to mid-July produced similar yields. Sweet corn (bioethanol) yields, harvested for stalks, increased from mid-June to mid-July. Precipitation was well above normal for much of the period and likely affected yields either through interference with planting, plant development, or harvest. The biofuel feedstock crops can be established and harvested at times that will allow development of production systems involving rotations with other biofuel feedstock or specialty crops.

Last Modified: 4/21/2014
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