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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Nectar Usage in a Southern Arizona Hawkmoth Community

Authors
item Alarcon Jr, Ruben
item Davidowitz, Goggy - UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA
item Bronstein, Judith - UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA

Submitted to: Ecological Entomology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: January 14, 2008
Publication Date: July 20, 2008
Citation: Alarcon, R., Davidowitz, G., Bronstein, J.L. 2008. Nectar usage in a southern Arizona hawkmoth community. Ecological Entomology 33:503-509.

Interpretive Summary: The diversity of plants used for nectar by hawkmoths is poorly understood. In this study we examined the nectar use by a community of hawkmoths in a southern Arizona grassland by removing and identifying the pollen carried by moths attracted to collecting lights. Over a two year period we recorded 749 moths from 14 species. Most hawkmoths carried large amounts of pollen from two species Datura wrightii (Solanaceae) pollen, which is a classic hawkmoth-pollinated plant; the other, Agave palmeri (Agavaceae), which is a bat-adapted plant. The dominance of Agave suggests that it might be supporting hawkmoth populations for Datura wrightii and other hawkmoth-adapted plants in the community.

Technical Abstract: The diversity of plants used for nectar by hawkmoths is poorly understood. In this study we examined the nectar use by a community of hawkmoths in a southern Arizona grassland by removing and identifying the pollen carried by moths attracted to collecting lights. Over a 2 year period we recorded 749 moths from 14 species. Most hawkmoths carried large amounts of pollen from two species Datura wrightii (Solanaceae) pollen, which is a classic hawkmoth-pollinated plant; the other, Agave palmeri (Agavaceae), which is a bat-adapted plant. The dominance of Agave suggests that it might be supporting hawkmoth populations for Datura wrightii and other hawkmoth-adapted plants in the community.

Last Modified: 10/31/2014
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