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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: MOLECULAR MECHANISMS OF PHYTOCHROME SIGNALING AND GENE REGULATION Title: Phytochrome Induces Rapid PIF5 Phosphorylation and Degradation in Response to Red-Light Activation

Authors
item Shen, Yu - ARS-UCB PLNT GENE EXP CTR
item Khanna, Rajnish - ARS-UCB PLNT GENE EXP CTR
item Carle, Christine - ARS-UCB PLNT GENE EXP CTR
item Quail, Peter - ARS-UCB PLNT GENE EXP CTR

Submitted to: Plant Physiology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: August 29, 2007
Publication Date: September 7, 2007
Repository URL: http://www.plantphysiol.org/cgi/reprint/145/3/1043?maxtoshow=&HITS=10&hits=10&RESULTFORMAT=&author1=Quail%2C+Peter&searchid=1&FIRSTINDEX=0&sortspec=relevance&resourcetype=HWCIT
Citation: Shen, Y., Khanna, R., Carle, C.M., Quail, P.M. 2007. Phytochrome Induces Rapid PIF5 Phosphorylation and Degradation in Response to Red-Light Activation. Plant Physiology. 145:1043-1051.

Interpretive Summary: Previous evidence indicates that the binding of the photoactivated photoreceptor molecule to PIF3 induces rapid phosphorylation of the transcription factor in the cell prior to its degradation via the ubiqitin-proteosome system. To investigate whether this apparent primary signaling mechanism can be generalized to other phy-interacting partners, we have examined the molecular behavior of a second related phy-interacting member of the basic helix-loop-helix family, PIF5, during early deetiolation, immediately following initial exposure of dark-grown seedlings to light. The data show that red light induces very rapid phosphorylation and subsequent degradation (t1/2 < 5 min) of PIF5 via the proteosome system upon irradiation. Photobiological and genetic evidence indicates that the photoactivated phy molecule acts within 60 s to induce this phosphorylation of PIF5, and that phyA and phyB redundantly dominate this process, with phyD playing an apparently minor role. Collectively, the data support the proposal that the rapid phy-induced phosphorylation of PIF3 and PIF5 may represent the biochemical mechanism of primary signal transfer from photoactivated photoreceptor to binding partner, and that phyA and phyB (and possibly phyD) may signal to multiple, shared partners utilizing this common mechanism.

Technical Abstract: The phytochrome (phy) family of sensory photoreceptors (phyA–phyE in Arabidopsis thaliana) induces changes in target-gene expression upon light-induced translocation to the nucleus, where certain members interact with selected members of the constitutively nuclear basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor family, such as PHYTOCHROME-INTERACTING FACTOR3 (PIF3). Previous evidence indicates that the binding of the photoactivated photoreceptor molecule to PIF3 induces rapid phosphorylation of the transcription factor in the cell prior to its degradation via the ubiqitin-proteosome system. To investigate whether this apparent primary signaling mechanism can be generalized to other phy-interacting partners, we have examined the molecular behavior of a second related phy-interacting member of the basic helix-loop-helix family, PIF5, during early deetiolation, immediately following initial exposure of dark-grown seedlings to light. The data show that red light induces very rapid phosphorylation and subsequent degradation (t1/2 < 5 min) of PIF5 via the proteosome system upon irradiation. Photobiological and genetic evidence indicates that the photoactivated phy molecule acts within 60 s to induce this phosphorylation of PIF5, and that phyA and phyB redundantly dominate this process, with phyD playing an apparently minor role. Collectively, the data support the proposal that the rapid phy-induced phosphorylation of PIF3 and PIF5 may represent the biochemical mechanism of primary signal transfer from photoactivated photoreceptor to binding partner, and that phyA and phyB (and possibly phyD) may signal to multiple, shared partners utilizing this common mechanism.

Last Modified: 12/20/2014
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