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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: MICROBIAL ECOLOGY AND SAFETY OF FRESH ON-FARM ORGANICALLY GROWN PRODUCE Title: Comparison of hydrostatic and hydrodynamic pressure to inactivate foodborne viruses

Authors
item SHARMA, MANAN
item Shearer, Adrienne - UNIV DELAWARE
item Hoover, Dallas - UNIV DELAWARE
item Liu, Martha
item Solomon, Morse
item Kniel, Kalmia - UNIV DELAWARE

Submitted to: Innovative Food Science and Emerging Technologies
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: May 7, 2008
Publication Date: July 1, 2008
Citation: Sharma, M., Shearer, A., Hoover, D., Liu, M., Solomon, M.B., Kniel, K. 2008. Comparison of hydrostatic and hydrodynamic pressure to inactivate foodborne viruses. Innovative Food Science and Emerging Technologies. 9:418-422.

Interpretive Summary: Pressure technologies are of interest because they provide an intervention that kills microbes in foods while retaining the fresh-like qualities of the product. The effect of high hydrostatic pressure (HPP) and hydrodynamic pressure (HDP), in combination with chemical treatments, was evaluated for inactivation of foodborne viruses and non-pathogenic surrogates in a pork sausage product. Sausages were immersed in water, 100 ppm EDTA, or 2 percent lactoferrin, and then inoculated with feline calicivirus (FCV), hepatitis A virus (HAV) or bacteriophage (MS2, phiX174, or T4). In combination with water, HPP and HDP significantly reduced viral titers FCV, HAV, T4, and MS2. The inoculation of these viruses on meat surfaces may have protected them from complete inactivation by pressure treatments. This study represents the first evaluation of HDP on foodborne viruses and their surrogates, as well as the first study to evaluate the effects of viruses in a deli meat product.

Technical Abstract: The effect of high hydrostatic pressure (HPP) and hydrodynamic pressure (HDP), in combination with chemical treatments, was evaluated for inactivation of foodborne viruses and non-pathogenic surrogates in a pork sausage product. Sausages were immersed in water, 100 ppm EDTA, or 2 percent lactoferrin, and then inoculated with feline calicivirus (FCV), hepatitis A virus (HAV) or bacteriophage (MS2, phiX174, or T4). Each piece was packaged individually and subjected to pressure by either HDP, HPP (500 MPa, 5 min, 4 degrees celsius), or control (no pressure). In combination with water, HPP and HDP significantly (P<0.05) reduced titers of FCV by 2.89 and 2.70 log TCID-50/ml, and HAV by log 3.23 and 1.10, respectively, when compared to controls. Titers of T4 (1.48 and 1.10 log PFU/g) and MS2 (1.46 and 0.96 log PFU/g) were also significantly reduced by HPP and HDP treatments, respectively, in combination with water. Inoculation of viruses and bacteriophage on a meat product may have protected them from complete inactivation by pressure treatments.

Last Modified: 9/10/2014
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