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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: ENVIRONMENTALLY SOUND MANURE MANAGEMENT FOR REDUCTION OF HEALTH-RELATED MICROORGANISMS AND ODOR

Location: Agroecosystem Management Research

Title: Land application of manure for beneficial reuse

Authors
item Risse, L - UNIV OF GEORGIA
item Cabrera, M - UNIV OF GEORGIA
item Franzluebbers, Alan
item Gaskin, J - UNIV OF GEORGIA
item Gilley, John
item Killorn, R - IOWA STATE UNIV
item Zhang, H - IOWA STATE UNIV

Submitted to: Book Chapter
Publication Type: Book / Chapter
Publication Acceptance Date: December 30, 2006
Publication Date: October 15, 2006
Citation: Risse, L.M., Cabrera, M.L., Franzluebbers, A.J., Gaskin, J.W., Gilley, J.E., Killorn, R., Zhang, H. 2006. Land application of manure for beneficial reuse. Pp. 283-316 in Animal Agriculture and the Environment: National Center for Manure and Animal Waste Management White Papers. J. M. Rice, D. F. Caldwell, F. J. Humenik, eds. 2006. St. Joseph, Michigan: ASABE.

Interpretive Summary: The concentration of animal production systems has increased efficiency and improved overall economic return for animal producers. This concentration, along with the advent of commercial fertilizers, has led to a change in the way animal producers view manure. Manure, once valued as a resource by farmers, is now treated as a waste. Air and water quality concerns that arise primarily from the under-utilization or inefficient use of manure contribute to these changing views. However, when properly used, manure is a resource and should be regulated as such. In the United States, the USDA/EPA Unified National Strategy for Animal Feeding Operations outlines how animal feeding operations should be regulated and acknowledges that land application at proper agronomic rates is the preferred use for manures. However, many limitations such as water quality concerns, uncertainty in manure nutrient availability, high transportation costs, and odor concerns cause some to question land application. This paper documents the benefits of land application of manure, discusses limitations that hinder greater manure utilization, and outlines research and extension needs for improving manure utilization.

Technical Abstract: The concentration of animal production systems has increased efficiency and improved overall economic return for animal producers. This concentration, along with the advent of commercial fertilizers, has led to a change in the way animal producers view manure. Manure, once valued as a resource by farmers, is now treated as a waste. Air and water quality concerns that arise primarily from the under-utilization or inefficient use of manure contribute to these changing views. However, when properly used, manure is a resource and should be regulated as such. In the United States, the USDA/EPA Unified National Strategy for Animal Feeding Operations outlines how animal feeding operations should be regulated and acknowledges that land application at proper agronomic rates is the preferred use for manures. However, many limitations such as water quality concerns, uncertainty in manure nutrient availability, high transportation costs, and odor concerns cause some to question land application. This paper documents the benefits of land application of manure, discusses limitations that hinder greater manure utilization, and outlines research and extension needs for improving manure utilization.

Last Modified: 4/21/2014
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