Page Banner

United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: INTEGRATION OF NUTRITIONAL, GENETIC AND PHYSIOLOGICAL APPROACHES TO IMPROVE PRODUCTION EFFICIENCY OF RAINBOW TROUT Title: Apparent digestibility of gross nutrients from feedstuffs in extruded feeds for rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss

Authors
item Gaylord, Thomas
item Barrows, Frederic
item Rawles, Steven

Submitted to: Journal of the World Aquaculture Society
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: October 23, 2007
Publication Date: December 1, 2008
Repository URL: http://riley.nal.usda.gov/nal_web/digi/submission.html
Citation: Gaylord, T.G., Barrows, F., Rawles, S.D. 2008. Apparent digestibility of gross nutrients from feedstuffs in extruded feeds for rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss. Journal of the World Aquaculture Society.

Interpretive Summary: Determining the nutritional value of feed ingredients is critical to developing plant based diets for rainbow trout. The first step in this process is to determine the ability of rainbow trout to digest protein and energy from an ingredient when the ingredients are processed by cooking extrusion into floating feeds. The ingredients tested included five fish meals, three terrestrial animal by-products, five plant protein concentrates, four plant meals, and seven low protein plant ingredients. In the current trial, data were obtained to make comparisons between ingredients for use in cooking-extruded feeds and gives data for comparisons of ingredients/diets processed by cold-pelleting or extrusion.

Technical Abstract: The current experiment was performed to determine apparent protein and energy digestibility coefficients of feed ingredients by the fecal stripping technique using extruded diets. The ingredients tested included five fish meals, three terrestrial animal by-products, five plant protein concentrates, four plant meals, and seven low protein plant ingredients. Protein digestibility differed among fish meals and ranged from 90 for FAQ menhaden meal to 97% for anchovy meal. Protein ADCs in plant concentrates ranged from a low of 89% for rice protein concentrate to a high of 100% for wheat gluten meal. Apparent protein digestibility was lower in plant meals than fish meals with a low of 70% for flaxseed meal to a high of 89% for soybean meal. Low protein plant meals had generally lower protein ADC from 64% for rice bran to 85% for whole wheat. A similar pattern for energy ADCs was observed; ADCs ranged from 106% for anchovy meal to 32% for whole wheat. In the current trial, divergent protein and energy ADC values were obtained most notably in ingredients known to be high in fiber or have very high starch content. The comparability of ingredients/diets processed by cold-pelleting or extrusion thus appears questionable at this juncture.

Last Modified: 12/26/2014
Footer Content Back to Top of Page