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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: VECTOR COMPETENCE AND PROTECTION OF U.S. LIVESTOCK AND WILDLIFE FROM ARTHROPOD-BORNE DISEASES Title: Pathogens and bionomics of Lutzomyia apache (Diptera: Psychodidae) from Wyoming, USA

Authors
item Reeves, Will
item Kato, Cecilia
item Gilchriest, Travis - UNIVERSITY OF WYOMING

Submitted to: Journal of the American Mosquito Control Association
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: March 28, 2008
Publication Date: September 24, 2008
Citation: Reeves, W.K., Kato, C.Y., Gilchriest, T. 2008. Pathogens and bionomics of Lutzomyia apache (Diptera: Psychodidae) from Wyoming, USA. Journal of the American Mosquito Control Association. Vol 24:444-447.

Interpretive Summary: Sand flies feed on blood and transmit several disease causing agents. A species from the USA was recently incriminated as a vector of vesicular stomatitis viruses. We discovered new populations of this fly in Wyoming. Adult flies were tested for disease causing viruses and bacteria but none were identified. In addition no blood meals were identified in the flies. We discovered a bacteria and protozoan that infect both adult and larval flies.

Technical Abstract: Phlebotomine sand flies are vectors of bacteria, parasites, and viruses. Lutzomyia apache, a North American sand fly, was incriminated as a vector of vesicular stomatitis viruses (VSV) due to overlapping ranges of the sand fly and recent outbreaks of VSV. We report on the discovery of two populations of L. apache in Wyoming from Albany and Fremont Counties. We attempted to isolate VSV and Phleboviruses from sand flies from Albany County and screened select flies by PCR for Bartonella and blood meals. We did not isolate viruses or detect DNA from vertebrate hosts or Bartonella. Flies were also tested for insect pathogens and other microbes. We detected a Rickettsia sp. in all flies that were examined and a parasitic protozoa, Ascogregarina sp., from the midgut of a larva.

Last Modified: 10/1/2014
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