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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: INVESTIGATING THE IMPACT OF STRESS ON FOODBORNE PATHOGEN COLONIZATION IN TURKEYS

Location: Poultry Production and Products Safety Research

Title: Evaluation of alternative host bacteria as vehicles for oral administration of bacteriophages

Authors
item Bielke, L - UNIV OF ARKANSAS
item Higgins, Stacy - UNIV OF ARKANSAS
item Donoghue, Ann
item Kral, T - UNIV OF ARKANSAS
item Donoghue, Dan - UNIV OF ARKANSAS
item Hargis, B - UNIV OF ARKANSAS
item Tellez, G - UNIV OF ARKANSAS

Submitted to: International Journal of Poultry Science
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: October 31, 2007
Publication Date: November 1, 2007
Citation: Bielke, L.R., Higgins, S., Donoghue, A.M., Kral, T., Donoghue, D.J., Hargis, B.M., Tellez, G. 2007. Evaluation of alternative host bacteria as vehicles for oral administration of bacteriophages. International Journal of Poultry Science. 6(10):758-761.

Interpretive Summary: Survival of bacteriophages through the upper gastrointestinal tract (UGIT) and persistence in the lower gastrointestinal tract (LGIT) is essential for treatment of enteric bacterial infections. We have hypothesized that non-pathogenic Alternative Host Bacteriophage (AHB), originally isolated from poultry cecal samples, could be used to protect bacteriophages during UGIT passage and to provide host cells for continued amplification in the LGIT. We selected two previously identified Wide-Host-Range (WHR) bacteriophages (WHR-8 and WHR-10) and their respective AHB for use in the present studies. For each of the bacteriophage-host combinations, combinations of the bacteriophage and the AHB prior to oral gavage had little effect on the concentration of recovered bacteriophages from the cecal contents during the three day post administration. Furthermore, continuous administration of the AHB in the drinking water had little effect on intestinal bacteriophage recovery during the three days of evaluation. Bacteriophages were also tested for differences in anaerobic lysis of Salmonella enteritidis as a possible reason for decreased persistence in the LGIT. Differences in lysis between anaerobic and aerobic environments were significant, however levels were not likely different enough to have significant in vitro effects. These results suggest that selection of AHB to protect or amplify enteric bacteriophage populations is not necessarily a simple process. Survival of the AHB and the ability of the AHB to replicate in the LGIT of the target animals are among considerations that should be made in future investigations.

Technical Abstract: Survival of bacteriophages through the upper gastrointestinal tract (UGIT) and persistence in the lower gastrointestinal tract (LGIT) is essential for treatment of enteric bacterial infections. We have hypothesized that non-pathogenic Alternative Host Bacteriophage (AHB), originally isolated from poultry cecal samples, could be used to protect bacteriophages during UGIT passage and to provide host cells for continued amplification in the LGIT. We selected two previously identified Wide-Host-Range (WHR) bacteriophages (WHR-8 and WHR-10) and their respective AHB for use in the present studies. For each of the bacteriophage-host combinations, combinations of the bacteriophage and the AHB prior to oral gavage had little effect on the concentration of recovered bacteriophages from the cecal contents during the three day post administration. Furthermore, continuous administration of the AHB in the drinking water had little effect on intestinal bacteriophage recovery during the three days of evaluation. Bacteriophages were also tested for differences in anaerobic lysis of Salmonella enteritidis as a possible reason for decreased persistence in the LGIT. Differences in lysis between anaerobic and aerobic environments were significant, however levels were not likely different enough to have significant in vitro effects. These results suggest that selection of AHB to protect or amplify enteric bacteriophage populations is not necessarily a simple process. Survival of the AHB and the ability of the AHB to replicate in the LGIT of the target animals are among considerations that should be made in future investigations.

Last Modified: 10/1/2014
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