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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Short Communication: Effect of temporary glycosuria on molasses consumption in Holstein calves

Authors
item Wilcox, Clair
item Schutz, M - PURDUE UNIVERSITY
item Donkin, S - PURDUE UNIVERSITY
item Lay, Jr, Donald
item Eicher, Susan

Submitted to: Journal of Dairy Science
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: May 1, 2008
Publication Date: September 1, 2008
Citation: Wilcox, C.S., Schutz, M.M., Donkin, S.S., Lay Jr, D.C., Eicher, S.D. 2008. Short Communication: Effect of temporary glycosuria on molasses consumption in Holstein calves. Journal of Dairy Science. 91:3607-3610.

Interpretive Summary: Non-invasive measures of stress are needed for experimental purposes and for potential use in well-being audits. Sucrose consumption is frequently used to determine that a stress response has been induced in mice and rats. This study was conducted to determine the effect of experimentally increased glucose demand on the level of consumption of molasses by dairy calves. Three week old calves received a 0.365g of phlorizin by injection. Hourly urinary output, urinary glucose levels, and molasses consumption were measured. Molasses consumption for the 24 hours after treatment was greater for the phlorizin treated group (1.42g) than for the control group (0.72g). Urinary output was greatest over the 8 hours following the phlorizin treatment. Estimated glucose concentrations of urine increased 2 hours after phlorizon treatment and peaked at 4 hours after the injection, but did not change for control calves. Glucose concentrations were still elevated, but decreasing by 8 hours after the treatment. In three week old Holstein calves, molasses consumption increased significantly due to phlorizin treatment, suggesting that consumption of molasses is related to glucose demand. The results from this research provide a basis for a non-invasive measure to test stress responses of neonatal calves.

Technical Abstract: Non-invasive measures of stress are needed for experimental purposes and for potential use in well-being audits. Sucrose consumption is frequently used to determine that a stress response has been induced in mice and rats. This study was conducted to determine the effect of experimentally increased glucose demand on the level of consumption of molasses by dairy calves. Ten 3-wk-old calves were randomly assigned to 0.365g of phlorizin in 3 mL of saline by s.c.injection or to 3 mL of saline s.c.injection treaments in a randomized complete block design. Urinary output, urinary glucose levels, and molasses consumption were measured hourly. Molasses consumption for the 24 hours after treatment was greater (P = 0.02) for the phlorizin treated group (1.42g) than for the control group (0.72g). Mean 8-h urinary output was less (P = 0.026) for control calves (1.13 kg) than for phlorizin treated calves (1.67 kg). Mean urinary glucose concentration for control calves remained close to 0 mg/dL during the entire 8-h observation period and was greater (P < 0.001) for the phlorizin treated calves by 2h. Mean urinary glucose was 30 mg/dL for the first 2 h, peaked at 60 mg/dL 4 h post treatment, and ended at 16.6 mg/dL 8 h post treatment. In 3-wk-old Holstein calves, molasses consumption increased significantly due to phlorizin treatment, suggesting that consumption of molasses is related to glucose demand.

Last Modified: 8/22/2014
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